• Toggle Accessibility Statement
  • Skip to Main Content

writing competitions philippines 2021

PCC Essay Writing Contest

writing competitions philippines 2021

  • Mission and Vision
  • Office of the Chairperson
  • The Commissioners
  • E-BID Submission System
  • Certification
  • Resolutions
  • Minutes of Pre-bid Conference
  • Request for Quotation/Proposal/Expression of Interest/Invitation to Bid
  • Notices of Award
  • Notices to Proceed
  • Supplemental Bid Bulletin
  • Notices of Postponement, Eligibility, Short Listing and Highest Rated Bid
  • Philippine Development Plan 2023-2028
  • Citizen’s Charter
  • Gender and Development
  • Republic Act No. 10667
  • Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) of the Philippine Competition Act
  • MAO E-Notification
  • Notification Form
  • Model Request for Extension of Time and Waiver
  • Sample Template for Claims of Confidentiality
  • Model Request For Extension And Waiver For Motu Proprio Merger Review
  • Model Request for Consideration of Commitments and Waiver
  • Rules of Merger Procedure
  • Expedited Review Notification Form
  • Merger Review Guidelines
  • Guide to Computing Merger Notification Thresholds
  • Guidelines on Letters of Non-Coverage from Compulsory Notification
  • Guidelines on Notification of Joint Ventures
  • Guidance on Pre-Merger Exchanges of Information
  • Non-Horizontal Merger Guidelines
  • Guidelines for the Motu Proprio Review of Mergers and Acquisitions in Digital Markets
  • Interim Measures
  • FAQs on M&As
  • Consult with PCC
  • Rules of Procedure
  • Fines and Penalties
  • Bid rigging is against the law!
  • Leniency Program
  • FAQs on Leniency Program
  • File a Complaint
  • Full Administrative Investigations
  • Closure of Investigations
  • Guide For Businesses
  • Call for Comments
  • Market Inquiry
  • Handbook for the General Public
  • 1: An Introduction to Competition Law
  • 2: On Anti-competitive Agreements
  • 3: On Mergers & Acquisitions
  • 4: On Abuse of Dominant Position
  • Press Releases
  • Press Statements
  • Photo Gallery
  • Commission Decisions
  • Memorandum Circulars
  • Clarificatory Notes
  • Bar Exam Notes
  • Partnerships
  • Policy Advisories
  • Discussion Papers
  • Policy Notes
  • Policy Statements
  • Issues Papers
  • AEGC Publications
  • Annual Reports
  • Philippine Competition Bulletin
  • RISE: Realizing an Inclusive, Sustainable Economy through Competition
  • Primer on the Philippine Competition Act
  • Enforcement Handbook
  • Legal Booklet
  • FAQs on PCA and PCC
  • PCC – Brochure
  • Competition Matters
  • Infographics
  • Campus Tour
  • Forums for Businesses
  • 2021 Manila Forum
  • 2022 Manila Forum
  • Regional Roadshows
  • EATOP and EAC Events

GMA Logo

  • COVID-19 Full Coverage
  • Cover Stories
  • Ulat Filipino
  • Special Reports
  • Personal Finance
  • Other sports
  • Pinoy Achievers
  • Immigration Guide
  • Science and Research
  • Technology, Gadgets and Gaming
  • Chika Minute
  • Showbiz Abroad
  • Family and Relationships
  • Art and Culture
  • Health and Wellness
  • Shopping and Fashion
  • Hobbies and Activities
  • News Hardcore
  • Walang Pasok
  • Transportation
  • Missing Persons
  • Community Bulletin Board
  • GMA Public Affairs
  • State of the Nation
  • Unang Balita
  • Balitanghali
  • News TV Live

My Stream

Gawad LIRA 2021 Poetry Writing Contest now open for entries

writing competitions philippines 2021

Linangan sa Imahen, Retorika, at Anyo (LIRA) celebrates National Language Month with Gawad LIRA 2021, a contest that aims to give poets writing in the Filipino language an opportunity to showcase their flair for Filipino poetry and receive recognition and reward for their work. This contest also aims to promote and enrich Filipino poetry.

The contest is open to all poets writing in the Filipino language until October 29, 2021.

Here are the mechanics of the contest:

1. The contest is open to all, except for members of LIRA.

2. Entries must consist of a collection of ten (10) to fifteen (15) poems. Each collection should have a title.

3. Participants may submit poems in free verse, rhyme and meter, or a combination of both.

4. There is no required topic or theme for this contest; however, participants are highly encouraged to tackle socially relevant issues.

5. Entries should be the original work of the author and must be written in Filipino. These should not be a translation of any published work, and must not have been released in any publication.

6. All poems to be submitted should be in the Filipino language.

7. Entries can be submitted to [email protected]. In the subject line, write "Gawad LIRA." The email should contain the following:

  • The entry (in Portable Document Format [PDF])typewritten in Arial
  • font, 12pt font size, single spaced. A4 size with 1-inch margin all around.
  • Pen name. Do not put any hint or signifier of the real name of the participant.
  • Signed entry form: https://tinyurl.com/gawadlira2021

8. The last day of submission of entries is on October 29, 2021, 11:59 PM. Entries received after the deadline will no longer be accepted.

9. The committee will acknowledge entries it will receive via email. Entries with missing attachments or that do not follow the guidelines will be automatically disqualified. All entries received will be considered as final and complete. Any revisions made within the duration of the contest will no longer be accepted.

10. Prizes:

  • 1st Prize: Php 15,000 and trophy
  • 2nd Prize: Php 9,000 and plaque
  • 3rd Prize: Php 6,000 and plaque

11. The judges' decision is final and no correspondence will be entered in relation to their decision.

12. Anyone who will be caught and confirmed to have plagiarized will no longer be able to join the contest.

The winners will be contacted by the committee before the result will be released in public. Official public announcement of winners will be in December 2021 along with the 36th anniversary celebration of LIRA.

Along with this contest is Makata ng LIRA 2021, another Filipino poetry writing competition that is exclusive for LIRA members only.

For more information and for questions, email [email protected]. ___________________________________________________

Founded in 1985 by National Artist for Literature Virgilio S. Almario (Rio Alma), the organization had successfully honed some of the Philippines’ most admired poets including Victor Emmanuel Carmelo Nadera, Romulo Baquiran Jr., Michael M. Coroza, Roberto Añonuevo, Rebecca Añonuevo, Jerry Gracio, and Edgar Calabia Samar. In 2011, the organization was recognized as one of the Ten Accomplished Youth Organizations (TAYO) for its service-driven activities related to poetry by its poet-volunteers.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PalihangLIRA Instagram: makatangLIRA YouTube Channel: Makatang LRA E-mail Address: [email protected]

  • Good Balita
  • Good Pinoys
  • Good Travel
  • Good School
  • Good Advice
  • Good Business
  • Good Inspiration
  • Good Savings
  • Armando O. Bartolome
  • Agnes Hannah Balibay
  • Angie Quadra Balibay
  • Chinkee Tan
  • Mike Grogan
  • Qjiel Mariano
  • Rene Nonoy Molina
  • Trixie Esguerra
  • Wilson Lee Flores
  • Filipino Pride Advocate
  • Filipino Pride Newsmakers
  • Week in Review
  • My Pilipinas
  • Share Your Proud Pinoy News
  • GNP Advocates

Good News Pilipinas

Discover Philippine Education Excellence: Unveiling the Top 10 Good School Stories…

writing competitions philippines 2021

Discover Filipino Athletic Excellence: Unveiling the Top 10 Inspiring Sports Stories…

writing competitions philippines 2021

Discover the Top 10 Good Balita of 2023 on GoodNewsPilipinas.com: From…

writing competitions philippines 2021

Top 10 Filipino Entertainment Triumphs of 2023 – Discover Why They…

Contest: filipino writers’ prize worth php250k now accepting entries.

Filipino Writers accepting entries

The contest for the 2023 Filipino Writers’ Prize worth Php250,000 is now accepting entries for the biennial award given out by the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA).

The award in the gross amount of PHP 250,000 will assist the winner during the writing stage of the project. The award is good for one year, after which a polished final manuscript of the writing project will be submitted to the NCCA, particularly the National Committee on Literary Arts (NCLA) for possible publication or staging.

The NCCA Writers’ Prize award is given to five writers, one for each category, namely:

  • essay/creative non-fiction
  • short story

The National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA) issued the call for entries with the deadline set for June 30.

Applicants must submit:

  • an accomplished entry form (in PDF format)
  • notarized declaration with consent and release (in PDF format)
  • applicant’s curriculum vitae
  • 3-5 page concept paper discussing the rationale and significance of the project
  • initial output (refer to the table)
The Writers' Prize PHP 250,000 is given to 5 writers, one for each category: poetry, novel, essay/creative non-fiction, short story, and drama @NCCAOfficial https://t.co/iPVqAGvpgK — GoodNewsPilipinas.com (@GoodNewsPinas_) February 28, 2023

All entries shall be addressed and sent via email to: NCCA WRITERS’ PRIZE Secretariat Program Management Division (PMD) – Arts Section NATIONAL COMMISSION FOR CULTURE AND THE ARTS [email protected]

The NCCA also provides project grants. Here’s how to apply .

NCCA’s children’s TV show Heneral Tuna is now in book form .

SHARE THIS ARTICLE to spread the word about the Filipino Writers’ Prize call for entries!

Good News Pilipinas is a  Lasallian Scholarum Awardee . TELL US your good news story tips by messaging GoodNewsPilipinas.com on  Facebook ,  Twitter ,  Instagram , or e-mail [email protected] and WATCH  Good News Pilipinas TV YouTube  &  Good News Pilipinas TikTok  for more Filipino Pride stories!

RELATED ARTICLES MORE FROM AUTHOR

writing competitions philippines 2021

Filipino Delicacies Turon and Maruya Secure Spots in World’s Top 50 Donuts List

writing competitions philippines 2021

Donations for QC Public Libraries Mark Book-Giving Day

writing competitions philippines 2021

Send Love and Support Effortlessly: TANGGapp Revolutionizes US-Philippines Money Transfers

Top stories.

writing competitions philippines 2021

How to Track your Philippine National ID delivery

writing competitions philippines 2021

Marcelito Pomoy: “I’m a Champion” as America’s Got Talent judges, fans...

writing competitions philippines 2021

University of the Philippines Tops National Rankings in Webometrics, Showcases Global...

writing competitions philippines 2021

How to Check Your Voter Status for Philippine Elections

writing competitions philippines 2021

Philippine Innovation Unleashed: Top 10 Good Tech Stories of 2023 on...

Editor picks, winners list: anvil awards for outstanding business communication advocating..., goodnewspilipinas.com triumphs with gold anvil award: a testament to..., goodnewspilipinas.com vies for prestige at the 59th anvil awards:..., embracing a new era: goodnewspilipinas.com’s trailblazing journey to the..., 5 ways to be a good business partner to..., popular posts, marcelito pomoy: “i’m a champion” as america’s got talent..., university of the philippines tops national rankings in webometrics,..., philippine innovation unleashed: top 10 good tech stories of..., popular category.

  • Good Balita 1509
  • Good Show 1354
  • Good Sport 935
  • Good Pinoys 919
  • Good Advice 634
  • Good Travel 601
  • Good Tech 553
  • Good Business 523
  • Good School 505
  • Good Deed 487
  • Good Inspiration 290
  • Good News Pilipinas! TV 77
  • Good MSME 45
  • Good Savings 41

Good News Pilipinas

Good News Pilipinas is a news and information website that highlights the good in the Filipino and the Philippines.

Power Up Your Positivity! Catch all the Good-Vibes! Join the GoodNewsPilipinas.com VIP list and get your daily dose of sunshine and Pinoy Pride! Unwrap stories that put Filipino awesomeness in your life! CLICK the subscribe button for our e-newsletter and turn your inbox into a fiesta of feel-good news! Inspire your day, fuel your pride! 🇵🇭✨

© 2024 GoodNewsPilipinas.com

Privacy Overview

San Miguel Corporation

  • Search for Search

writing competitions philippines 2021

14-year-old Filipino teen wins 1st place at Oxford University Press Story Writing Competition

Photo of Neil Bie

A young Filipino was hailed as the winner of one of Emirates Festival of Literature’s competition that focuses on the talent of emerging story writers in the country.

Charles Samuel Vitug, a 14-year-old Filipino, won first place at the Oxford University Press Story Writing Competition for 2021 for the 12-14 year old age group for his piece titled “”.

The teenager shared that he came up with the story from his own experience of experiencing a writer’s block, and how he managed to overcome the challenge.

“I wrote my story out of my own lack of inspiration. I wondered about how I could transform the narrative in a way that no one would have thought of before. It was extra hard as it was my first time writing a short story in a very long time. Its premise was of a young writer who couldn’t conjure an original idea, let alone flesh it out into a short story. He eventually manages to find inspiration through his surroundings, his past experiences, and most importantly, himself,” said Charles.

Charles Vitug Oxford University Press Emirates Fest Lit 2021 2

Kathy Hoopmann, one of the judges in the said competition, commended Charles’ creativity when he wrote about one of the top struggles of many writers, citing that the piece was inventive and enjoyable at the same time. She furthered that Charles’ work as among those who came on top from over 3000 entries, 1000 of which were Arabic.

“A story about a boy with writers’ block writing a story – how clever is that! Every author relates to the frustation when the words will not flow. And every author knows that the ending will only come when they confront their blank page and challenge themselves , “What will the story look like if I finish this?” An inventive, well written and enjoyable story,” said Hoopman.

Catherine, mother of Charles, shares that she was exhilarated when her son was called up on the stage sharing that she had always believed in his capability to churn out a well-crafted story.

“I felt so happy that he won first place in his age bracket which is for 12-14 year old, because this is his first time to join a story writing competition. We are so proud, because it’s like representing the Philippines here in UAE. To my son Charles, I hope this is not the last time. I hope that this experience will inspire you more to write and believe in yourself. We are proud of you!,” said Catherine.

Charles hopes that his win will be an inspiration for young fellow Filipinos as he himself wishes to explore more of the wonders of writing stories.

“Read a lot. Read everything you can read. Read the good, the bad, and everything in between. Learn how to recognize what makes stories enjoyable, and what makes them not. Most importantly, take your time, it took me an entire day just to write 960 words. Diamonds may be formed under pressure, but dough rises when you let it rest. Don’t worry if it seems like your skill is lacking, you CAN improve,” said Charles.

Photo of Neil Bie

Related Articles

iStock 1335862390

PH Immigration warns on illegal recruitment through fake marriage

Cami Template 1 3

Famous vloggers Jai Asuncion and Agassi Ching confirm break-up on IG

Cami Template 13

RTA: 702 million passengers in 2023

Katie WEB 23

Philippines shines at Gulfood 2024, showcasing culinary innovation of Filipino food companies

Privacy overview.

OCTOBER 27, 2022

writing competitions philippines 2021

  • INQUIRER.NET
  • F&B REPORT
  • Arts and Books , Headlines , Ria`s Trending

Gawad Lira 2021 poetry writing contest now accepting entries

  • October 31, 2021

Gawad Lira 2021

Linangan sa Imahen, Retorika, at Anyo (Lira) celebrates National Language Month with Gawad Lira 2021, a contest that aims to give poets writing in the Filipino language an opportunity to showcase their flair for Filipino poetry and receive recognition and reward for their work. This contest also aims to promote and enrich Filipino poetry.

The contest is open to all poets writing in the Filipino language until Oct. 29.

Here are the mechanics of the contest:

  • The contest is open to all, except for members of Lira.
  • Entries must consist of a collection of 10 to 15 poems. Each collection should have a title.
  • Participants may submit poems in free verse, rhyme and meter, or a combination of both.
  • There is no required topic or theme for this contest; however, participants are highly encouraged to tackle socially relevant issues.
  • Entries should be the original work of the author and must be written in Filipino. These should not be a translation of any published work, and must not have been released in any publication.
  • All poems to be submitted should be in the Filipino language.
  • Entries can be submitted to [email protected] . In the subject line, write “Gawad Lira.” The email should contain the following: the entry (in Portable Document Format [PDF]), typewritten in Arial font, 12 points font size, single spaced. A4 size with 1-inch margin all around. Pen name. Do not put any hint or signifier of the real name of the participant. Signed entry form: tinyurl.com/gawadlira2021. Bionote.
  • The last day of submission of entries is on Oct. 29, 11:59 p.m.
  • The committee will acknowledge entries it will receive via email. Entries with missing attachments or that do not follow the guidelines will be automatically disqualified. All entries received will be considered as final and complete. Any revisions made within the duration of the contest will no longer be accepted.
  • Prizes: first prize: P15,000 and trophy; second prize: P9,000 and plaque; third prize: P6,000 and plaque.
  • The judges’ decision is final and no correspondence will be entered in relation to their decision.
  • Anyone who will be caught and confirmed to have plagiarized will no longer be able to join the contest.

Winners will be announced in December during with the 36th anniversary celebration of Lira.

Along with this contest is Makata ng Lira 2021, another Filipino poetry writing competition that is exclusive for Lira members only.

Email [email protected] .

Subscribe to our daily newsletter

By providing an email address. I agree to the Terms of Use and acknowledge that I have read the Privacy Policy .

MOST VIEWED STORIES

  • LIFESTYLE.INQ Art , LIFESTYLE.INQ Latest

This Edition of Art Fair Philippines Shone a Spotlight on Photography

  • BY Lala Singian
  • February 19, 2024

artu nepomuceno art fair ph

Changing Shades: Artist Jigger Cruz Introduces a New Style of Painting

  • February 15, 2024

Jigger Cruz

  • LIFESTYLE.INQ Entertainment , LIFESTYLE.INQ Latest

Memeable Moments That Turned Super Bowl 2024 Into an Instant Classic

  • BY Carl Martin Agustin

Alicia Keys and Usher during the Super Bowl LVIII Halftime Show

‘Poor Things’ Review: Emma Stone’s Finest Performance Yet

  • February 14, 2024

Emma Stone, Willem Dafoe, and Ramy Youssef in Yorgos Lanthimos’ “Poor Things”

TOP STORIES

What To Expect at ALT Philippines 2024

MORE FROM LIFESTYLE.INQ

Hello softness; goodbye hard minimalism

FROM THE NICHE TITLES

writing competitions philippines 2021

CURRENT. DYNAMIC. INSIDER.

The latest in global fashion, beauty, and culture through a contemporary Filipino perspective.

CONNECT WITH US

  • instagram.com/lifestyle.inq
  • facebook.com/lifestyle.inq
  • youtube.com/lifestyle.inq
  • [email protected]

Stay in touch and get the latest stories from the LIFESTYLE.INQ newsletter

writing competitions philippines 2021

  • ENTERTAINMENT
  • HUMAN INTEREST

writing competitions philippines 2021

COPYRIGHT © LIFESTYLE INQUIRER 2022

  • Agri-Commodities
  • Asean Economic Community
  • Banking & Finance
  • Entrepreneur
  • Executive Views
  • Export Unlimited
  • Harvard Management Update
  • Monday Morning
  • Mutual Funds
  • Stock Market Outlook
  • The Integrity Initiative
  • Editorial cartoon
  • Design&Space
  • Digital Life
  • 360° Review
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Biodiversity
  • Climate Change
  • Environment
  • Envoys & Expats
  • Health & Fitness
  • Mission: PHL
  • Perspective
  • Photo Gallery
  • Today in History
  • Tony&Nick
  • When I Was 25
  • Wine & Dine
  • Live & In Quarantine
  • Bulletin Board
  • Public Service
  • The Broader Look

Today’s front page, Tuesday, February 20, 2024

screenshot 2024 02 20 at 4.55.58 am

Letter-writing competition unfolds for young Filipinos

  • BusinessMirror
  • March 27, 2021
  • 2 minute read

THE Philippine Postal Corporation (PHLPost) and the Universal Postal Union (UPU) based in Berne, Switzerland, recently launched the 50th International Letter-Writing Competition (2021) for the youth to promote better understanding around the world through the post office, especially during this time of the coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) pandemic.

The competition will focus on the theme: “Write a letter to a family member about your experience of Covid-19.”

A specialized agency of the United Nations, the UPU says that the current generation of children has tragically fallen to the pandemic. The competition is an opportunity for children around the world to write about their experiences in these unusual months, and to remind everyone that literacy is extremely important for a child’s future.

PHLPost, on the other hand, acknowledges the importance of families’ well-being by keeping members connected during this difficult period.

According to PHLPost, all elementary and high-school students in public and private schools nationwide who are Filipino citizens ages 15-years-old and below are qualified to join. Compositions must be recent, unpublished and original letters in English, handwritten, strictly adherent to the theme, and must not exceed the limit of 1,000 words in length.

On a separate sheet of paper, the participant must indicate the number of words of the letter composition, his/her complete name and address, gender, age and date of birth, name of school and address, grade level, and contact numbers. A 2×2 colored digital ID photo with a minimum resolution of 300 DPI must accompany the submission.

Local entries must reach PHLPost, via post office, on April 2. Selection of semifinalists will be done on or before April 12. Entries sent through private couriers shall automatically be disqualified.

The contest hopes to develop young students’ skills in composition, while fostering their enjoyment in letter writing. It is also an excellent way of making minors aware of the important role postal services play in society—one that has become even more noteworthy during the global pandemic.

The first-prize winner will receive P15,000; second prize, P10,000; and third prize, P5,000; plus other recognitions. The first-prize entry on the national level will automatically qualify for the UPU International Letter Writing Competition to be held in Switzerland.

For more information on the contest, call PHLPost’s Postshop, Philately and Museum Division Special Project Officer Joy Edralin-Cacho at 8527-01-32, or log on to www.phlpost.gov.ph.

Related Topics

‘space’s the limit’ for phl’s nanosatellite developer.

  • March 20, 2021

DepEd Commons: Year 1 yields over 9 million unique users

  • Claudeth Mocon-Ciriaco

Bill seeks to boost employability, competitiveness of senior high school students

  • Jovee Marie N. de la Cruz
  • February 19, 2024

education01 021724

Malaysian government, firm donate books to Marawi schoolkids

  • Nef Luczon | PNA
  • February 17, 2024

education02 021724

Japan embassy, PHILFEJA hold ‘Shinnenkai’ new year celebration

Canada to decrease number of new international student permits issued to approximately 360,000 for 2024: how are filipinos affected, private sector urged to join coalition to aid early-grade learning outcomes.

  • Roderick Abad

image6 (1)

Playing is the new learning: How playdates can fuel your child’s love for learning

education04 021024

Italy’s embassy serves free  language course in Tondo

  • Malou Talosig-Bartolome
  • February 10, 2024

education02 021024

CX leader Foundever, PBEd to provide growth opportunities for Filipino youth

Global alliance webinar draws 2,000+ participants, explores ai impact on pr for students, young pros.

education03 021024

UST Accountancy profs appointed to Asean workgroup committees

Iacademy upbeat on pinoys’ proficiencies in game development.

  • Rizal Raoul Reyes

education01 021024

CHED official says tertiary students need more facilities

  • Sarwell Meniano | PNA

423422704 7286804191400964 3443263993000553670 n

Adamson University celebrates Vincentian Education in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

  • February 9, 2024

Teacher-education schools with zero passers behind PISA debacle?

  • February 8, 2024

Athena offers free MBA for Filipino executive assistants

  • February 3, 2024

education01 020224

Senate commends DLSU on essential EDCOM II role

  • Butch Fernandez

education03 020224

Applications for postgraduate ‘Manaaki’ New Zealand Scholarships now open

education02 020224

Mapúa MCM, Arizona State U lead Dabawenyo health, business students into global learning

pup entrance exam 2024

PUP dominates as top talent source

  • January 29, 2024

ecucation04 012724

York University, Benilde seal partnership for joint academic, project development

  • January 27, 2024

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

Input your search keywords and press Enter.

The Best Writing Contests of 2024

Writing competitions curated by Reedsy

  • Children's
  • Flash Fiction

Non-fiction

  • Science Fiction
  • Science Writing
  • Script Writing
  • Short Story
  • Young Adult

Manage a competition? Submit it here

Writing prompts #2

Join our short story competition

Submit a short story based on 1 of 5 weekly prompts. Winners get $250.

Showing 320 contests

The reedsy prompts contest.

Every Friday, Reedsy sends out five writing prompts. Enter your response within a week for a chance at $250. Winners may also be included in a future issue of Reedsy’s literary magazine, Prompted.

Additional prizes

$25 credit toward Reedsy editorial services

Entry requirements

Deadline: December 31, 2023 (Expired)

Fiction, Short Story

Anthology Nature Writing Competition 2024

Anthology Magazine

The Anthology Nature Writing Competition is created to celebrate the beauty of the natural world, inspire literary excellence and encourage Anthology’s readers to explore the great outdoors. Whether it’s the wonder of life right in your own garden, an encounter with wildlife, the serenity of a forest, a reflection on environmental challenges, or the healing power of nature, we welcome your stories.

Publication

Deadline: September 30, 2024

Anthology Personal Memoir Competition 2024

Everyone has a story to tell. What’s yours? Authors are invited to share a unique life experience. Whether your memoir recounts a transformative journey, a poignant moment, or a life-altering event, we welcome your story. The Anthology Personal Memoir Competition is open to original and previously unpublished memoirs in the English language by writers of any nationality, living anywhere in the world.

Deadline: August 31, 2024

Anthology Travel Writing Competition 2024

The Anthology Travel Writing Competition is open to original and previously unpublished travel articles in the English language by writers of any nationality, living anywhere in the world. We are looking for an engaging article that will capture the reader’s attention, conveying a strong sense of the destination and the local culture. Max 1000 words.

Deadline: November 30, 2024

Essay, Non-fiction, Travel

Anthology Flash Fiction Award

The Anthology Flash Fiction Competition is open to original and previously unpublished flash fiction on any theme in the English language by writers of any nationality. We are looking for writing that is clever and unique, inspires us, and crafts a compelling story. Max 250 words.

Fiction, Short Story, Flash Fiction

Ironclad Creative Short Story Competition

Ironclad Creative CIC

We are looking for short stories that respond in any way to: 7:12am. You can use that in the text, as a theme, or any way you want. We accept any prose genre and any length of story up to 6k words. We’re looking for writers who have exciting voices and can move us - that can happen in any genre of prose. We’re not accepting plays or poetry for this competition.

2nd: £50 | 3rd & 4th: £25 | 10 short-listed entries: publication

Deadline: April 30, 2024

Fiction, Short Story, Crime, Fantasy, Flash Fiction, Horror, Humor, Mystery, Novella, Romance, Science Fiction, Thriller

International Voices in Creative Nonfiction Competition

Vine Leaves Press

Small presses have potential for significant impact, and at Vine Leaves Press, we take this responsibility quite seriously. It is our responsibility to give marginalized groups the opportunity to establish literary legacies that feel rich and vast. Why? To sustain hope for the world to become a more loving, tolerable, and open space. It always begins with art. That is why we have launched this writing competition.

Book publication

Deadline: July 01, 2024

Essay, Memoir, Non-fiction, Novel

Young Sports Journalist 2024

The Young Sports Journalist Competition, 2024, seeks well-argued articles from aspiring journalists aged 14-21. Winning entries will be published online and printed in the Summer Issue of Pitch. Critiqued by our panel of accomplished judges, winners will also receive a £50 cash prize and offered work experience here at PITCH HQ. The competition runs from 7 February 2024 to 5 April 2024. And winners will be announced in May.

Publication in magazine and online

💰 Fee: FREE

Deadline: April 05, 2024

Essay, Non-fiction

Not Quite Write Prize for Flash Fiction

Not Quite Write

The Not Quite Write Prize for Flash Fiction challenges writers to create an original piece of flash fiction based on two typical writing prompts plus one ""anti-prompt"". An anti-prompt is a challenge to break a specific “rule” of writing while telling a great story. Participants compete for AU$2,000 in cash prizes, including AU$1,000 for the winner, cash prizes for the entire shortlist and two bonus ‘wildcard’ prizes. Winners are read aloud on the Not Quite Write podcast, where the judges share in-depth analysis about the entries and offer free writing advice. The Not Quite Write Prize for Flash Fiction is hosted in Australia and open to all writers of any age and level of ability around the world.

Publication on the Not Quite Write website and podcast

Deadline: April 21, 2024

Crime, Fantasy, Fiction, Flash Fiction, Horror, Humor, Mystery, Romance, Science Fiction, Science Writing, Thriller, Young Adult

Write By The Sea Literary Festival 2024

Write By the Sea

Write By The Sea is a dynamic boutique literary festival set in the beautiful fishing village of Kilmore Quay, County Wexford. The independent panel of judges will select the winners of each category and winners will be invited to read their work as part of the Festival.

2nd: €300 | 3rd: €200 | Publication

Deadline: June 21, 2024

Fiction, Flash Fiction, Memoir, Poetry

The Free Verse Prize

Poetry Society

The Free Verse Prize is a new poetry prize, which supports the Free Verse Poetry Book and Magazine Fair. The judge is poet and former Poetry Book Fair director, Chrissy Williams. Poems can be on any theme, and should have fewer than 40 lines.

Publication in Poetry News and the Poetry Book Fair programme

Deadline: March 18, 2024

Kinsman Poetry Slam

Kinsman Avenue Publishing, Inc

Poetry entries wanted for the upcoming collection, SLAM! Up to $300 in cash prizes. We are looking for captivating rhythm, form, hard-hitting themes of culture, resilience, passion, and justice. BIPOC Poets are encouraged to submit. Entries should have unpredictable patterns of rhyme and explore free verse and playfulness with language.

Publication in Kinsman Quarterly and the "SLAM" anthology.

Queen Mary Wasafiri New Writing Prize

The 2024 Queen Mary Wasafiri New Writing Prize, the fifteenth edition of the prestigious prize, is open from 1 February to 1 July 2024. Exceptionally international in scope, the prize supports writers who have not yet published a book-length work, with no limits on age, gender, nationality, or background. The winners of each category will receive a £1,000 cash prize and publication in Wasafiri magazine.

Deadline: June 30, 2024

Fiction, Poetry, Short Story

Jim Martin Memorial Story Contest

Arizona Mystery Writers

Every year the Arizona Mystery Writers hosts the Jim Martin Memorial Story Contest. Naturally, since we’re the Arizona Mystery Writers, we want a mystery story, but we’re flexible about the boundaries of that category, and we also accept thrillers and suspense stories. It doesn’t matter if your story’s characters are in outer space, riding horses, or living underground. Costumes and settings don’t matter as long as the story is a mystery, thriller, or suspense tale as described.

2nd: $100 | 3rd: $75

Deadline: August 01, 2024

Fiction, Mystery, Short Story

Francine Ringold Awards for New Writers

University of Tulsa

The Francine Ringold Awards for New Writers honor the work of writers at the beginning of their careers. $500 prizes will be awarded in both the fiction and poetry categories, and the winning manuscripts will appear in the spring issue of Nimrod. Winners will have the chance to work with the Nimrod board of editors to refine and edit their manuscripts before publication.

Deadline: July 15, 2024

HG Wells Short Story Competition

HG Wells Competition

There are two different competitions in 2024: one for those 21 and under, and one for those over 21. The competition for those 21 and under is free to enter and has a prize of £1,000 for the winning entry. All shortlisted entries will also be published in a quality, professionally published paperback anthology.

Under 21: £1,000 | Over 21: £500

Deadline: July 08, 2024

Fantasy, Fiction, Science Fiction, Short Story

42 Miles Press Poetry Award

42 Miles Press

The 42 Miles Press Poetry Award was created in an effort to bring urgent and original voices to the poetry reading public. The prize is offered annually to any poet writing in English, including poets who have never published a full-length book as well as poets who have published several. New and Selected collections of poems are also welcome.

Deadline: June 15, 2024

Tusculum Review Nonfiction Chapbook Prize

The Tusculum Review

A prize of $1,000, publication of the essay in The Tusculum Review’s 20th Anniversary Issue (2024), and creation of a limited edition stand-alone chapbook with original art is awarded. Editors of The Tusculum Review and contest judge Mary Cappello will determine the winner of the 2024 prize.

Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize

Marsh Hawk Press

Beginning December 1, 2023, Marsh Hawk Press is accepting submissions of poetry manuscripts to the annual Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prizes. Deadline is April 30, 2024. We welcome submissions from emerging as well as established poets. The winner of the Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize receives $1,000.00, book publication and promotion. Winners of the Robert Creeley and Rochelle Ratner prizes, selected from finalists, receive $250.00 each.

$1000 + publication

Maggie Award for Prepublished Writers

Georgia Romance Writers

The purpose of the Prepublished Maggie Award for Excellence is to encourage, recognize, and reward the mastery of romance writing by Prepublished authors of romantic fiction. The Maggie Award is a symbol of achievement given by the Georgia Romance Writers (GRW) to bring special attention to these writers. The Maggie Award, a silver medallion commissioned by GRW, receives national attention.

Fiction, Novel, Romance

Fabula Press Short Story Contest

Fabula Press

Fabula Press’ annual short story competition has two segments – a free section, and a paid section. At least 3 submissions from the free section will be selected for publication in the Fabula Press Anthology and on the Fabula Press website; for paid submissions, at least twelve entries will be included in the anthology on the website. There is no theme for our contests; also, barring a few exceptions, we are flexible about genre

2nd: $250 | 3rd: $100 | Stories selected for publication: $75

Deadline: June 07, 2024

Maggie Award for Published Writers

The purpose of the Published Maggie Award for Excellence is to recognize the achievements of published authors of romantic fiction. The Maggie Award is a symbol of achievement given by the Georgia Romance Writers (GRW) to bring special attention to these authors. The Maggie, a silver medallion commissioned by GRW, receives national attention. Books will be ranked by librarians, booksellers, and other professionals in the publishing industry.​​

Novel, Romance

Creative Nonfiction Prize

Indiana Review

Send us one creative nonfiction piece, up to 5000 words, for a chance at $1000 + publication. This year's contest will be judged by Lars Horn.

Deadline: March 31, 2024

Essay, Fiction, Non-fiction

Indiana Review Poetry Prize

For our Poetry Prize, send no more than three poems in a single document. The winner will be awarded $1000 and publication in an upcoming issue of Indiana Review. This year's contest will be judged by Oliver Baez Bendorf.

Self-Publishing Literary Awards

Black Caucus

Through this contest, the BCALA honors the best self-published ebooks by an African American author in the U.S. in both fiction and poetry genres. These awards acknowledge outstanding achievement in the presentation of the cultural, historical and sociopolitical aspects of the Black Diaspora. The purpose is to encourage the artistic expression of the African American experience via literature and scholarly research including biographical, historical, and social history treatments by African Americans.

Deadline: February 29, 2024

Fiction, Non-fiction, Novel, Poetry

Jane Martin Poetry Prize

Girton College

The Jane Martin Poetry Prize is a national poetry competition, established in 2010, in memory of Girton alumna, Jane Elizabeth Martin (1978 Classics) through the generous support of Professor Sir Laurence Martin. Now in its 14th year, this national prize for young poets is a key part of the College’s support for poetry and will be of interest to all those who are serious about literary excellence. The competition is judged by experts drawn from across the literary world and academia. We are thrilled that this year the panel will be led by two judges – Abigail Parry and Bohdan Piasecki.

Deadline: March 15, 2024

Inception 2024: $500 for Best Opening

Sunspot Literary Journal

Beginnings have the power to spark passion or curiosity. They might immediately connect a specific place and time with an emotional tone. The best openings offer a feeling, atmosphere, action, or image that is gripping, and hints at more to come. Meaning, thoughtfulness, emotions, or tone draw audiences into the moment. For Sunspot Lit’s Inception contest, send your best opening. There are no restrictions on theme, category, or the length of the piece or collection from which the excerpt comes.

Fiction, Poetry

Elegant Literature's Award For New Writers

Elegant Literature

One of the largest awards open to unpublished writers, and the only one closed to professionals. We are the first magazine to pay pro rates and only accept submissions from new writers, putting over $100k into the hands of emerging talent around the globe. One new writer receives the grand prize. We also choose the best stories, pay the authors professional rates, and publish them in our magazine.

Paid publication, 25 x $20 USD | Free entry to Novelist Accelerator

Crime, Fantasy, Fiction, Horror, Humor, Mystery, Romance, Science Fiction, Short Story, Thriller, Young Adult, Flash Fiction, Science Writing

The Pinch Literary Awards & Page Prize

The Pinch Literary Journal

The 2023 Pinch Literary Awards accepts poetry and fiction. The 2023 Page Prize accepts non-fiction.

$2000 for poetry & fiction winners

$1000 for Page Prize winner

Fiction, Poetry, Short Story, Non-fiction

Novel Fair 2025

Irish Writers Centre

Now in its 13th year, the Novel Fair is an annual competition initiated by the Irish Writers Centre. Described by The Irish Times as ‘A Dragons’ Den for writers’, each year the Fair introduces twelve up-and-coming writers to top publishers and literary agents, giving novelists the opportunity to bypass the slush pile, pitch their ideas and place their synopsis and sample chapters directly into the hands of industry professionals.

Present your novel to leading publishers and agents at the Irish Writers Centre

Fiction, Novel

The Heartland Review Open Calls

The Heartland Review

Founded in 2000, The Heartland Review (ISSN: 2473-9545) is published in the spring and fall as an imprint of The Heartland Review Press. Our biannual journal publishes fiction, creative nonfiction/fiction, and poetry of any all subcategories, styles, and voices. Our writers have ranged in age from 15 to 80+ from around the world. We consider established writers as well as emerging writers. In the past we have reserved space for student writers and emerging artists. We are currently accepting poetry.

Publication in The Heartland Review

Deadline: April 15, 2024

High School Academic Research Competition

Columbia Undergraduate Science Journal

The High School Academic Research Competition is where talented students from around the world compete to publish high-quality research on any topic. SARC challenges students to sharpen their critical thinking skills, immerse themselves in the research process, and hone their writing skills for success.

Indigo Research Intensive Summer Program

Deadline: March 20, 2024

Annual Student Essay Contest

Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum

For this year’s Essay Contest, we are asking students to think about why the story of the Oklahoma City bombing is important today.

Deadline: March 04, 2024

Solas Awards

Best Travel Writing

Extraordinary stories about travel and the human spirit have been the cornerstones of our books since 1993. With the Solas Awards we honor writers whose work inspires others to explore. We’re looking for the best stories about travel and the world. Funny, illuminating, adventurous, uplifting, scary, inspiring, poignant stories that reflect the unique alchemy that occurs when you enter unfamiliar territory and begin to see the world differently as a result. We hope these awards will be a catalyst for those who love to leave home and tell others about it.

Deadline: September 21, 2024

Creative Writing Award for Short Fiction

Aesthetica Magazine

The Aesthetica Creative Writing Award celebrates outstanding writers. The Award was launched after the publication of Aesthetica Magazine, as a way to support the next generation of literary talent. The Creative Writing Award is open to Poetry and Short Fiction submissions on any theme, however, we are particularly interested in works that reflect upon our ever changing world.

Publication in the Aesthetica Creative Writing Annual | A five-day course from Arvon | Consultation with Redhammer Management | Six-week writing short stories course from Curtis Brown Creative

Discover the finest writing contests of 2024 for fiction and non-fiction authors — including short story competitions, essay writing competitions, poetry contests, and many more. Updated weekly, these contests are vetted by Reedsy to weed out the scammers and time-wasters. If you’re looking to stick to free writing contests, simply use our filters as you browse.

Why you should submit to writing contests

Submitting to poetry competitions and free writing contests in 2024 is absolutely worth your while as an aspiring author: just as your qualifications matter when you apply for a new job, a writing portfolio that boasts published works and award-winning pieces is a great way to give your writing career a boost. And not to mention the bonus of cash prizes!

That being said, we understand that taking part in writing contests can be tough for emerging writers. First, there’s the same affliction all writers face: lack of time or inspiration. Entering writing contests is a time commitment, and many people decide to forego this endeavor in order to work on their larger projects instead — like a full-length book. Second, for many writers, the chance of rejection is enough to steer them clear of writing contests. 

But we’re here to tell you that two of the great benefits of entering writing contests happen to be the same as those two reasons to avoid them.

When it comes to the time commitment: yes, you will need to expend time and effort in order to submit a quality piece of writing to competitions. That being said, having a hard deadline to meet is a great motivator for developing a solid writing routine.

Think of entering contests as a training session to become a writer who will need to meet deadlines in order to have a successful career. If there’s a contest you have your eye on, and the deadline is in one month, sit down and realistically plan how many words you’ll need to write per day in order to meet that due date — and don’t forget to also factor in the time you’ll need to edit your story!

For tips on setting up a realistic writing plan, check out this free, ten-day course: How to Build a Rock-Solid Writing Routine.

In regards to the fear of rejection, the truth is that any writer aspiring to become a published author needs to develop relatively thick skin. If one of your goals is to have a book traditionally published, you will absolutely need to learn how to deal with rejection, as traditional book deals are notoriously hard to score. If you’re an indie author, you will need to adopt the hardy determination required to slowly build up a readership.

The good news is that there’s a fairly simple trick for learning to deal with rejection: use it as a chance to explore how you might be able to improve your writing.

In an ideal world, each rejection from a publisher or contest would come with a detailed letter, offering construction feedback and pointing out specific tips for improvement. And while this is sometimes the case, it’s the exception and not the rule.

Still, you can use the writing contests you don’t win as a chance to provide yourself with this feedback. Take a look at the winning and shortlisted stories and highlight their strong suits: do they have fully realized characters, a knack for showing instead of telling, a well-developed but subtly conveyed theme, a particularly satisfying denouement?

The idea isn’t to replicate what makes those stories tick in your own writing. But most examples of excellent writing share a number of basic craft principles. Try and see if there are ways for you to translate those stories’ strong points into your own unique writing.

Finally, there are the more obvious benefits of entering writing contests: prize and publication. Not to mention the potential to build up your readership, connect with editors, and gain exposure.

Resources to help you win writing competitions in 2024

Every writing contest has its own set of submission rules. Whether those rules are dense or sparing, ensure that you follow them to a T. Disregarding the guidelines will not sway the judges’ opinion in your favor — and might disqualify you from the contest altogether. 

Aside from ensuring you follow the rules, here are a few resources that will help you perfect your submissions.

Free online courses

On Writing:

How to Craft a Killer Short Story

The Non-Sexy Business of Writing Non-Fiction

How to Write a Novel

Understanding Point of View

Developing Characters That Your Readers Will Love

Writing Dialogue That Develops Plot and Character

Stop Procrastinating! Build a Solid Writing Routine

On Editing:

Story Editing for Authors

How to Self-Edit Like a Pro

Novel Revision: Practical Tips for Rewrites

How to Write a Short Story in 7 Steps

How to Write a Novel in 15 Steps

Literary Devices and Terms — 35+ Definitions With Examples

10 Essential Fiction Writing Tips to Improve Your Craft

How to Write Dialogue: 8 Simple Rules and Exercises

8 Character Development Exercises to Help You Nail Your Character

Bonus resources

200+ Short Story Ideas

600+ Writing Prompts to Inspire You

100+ Creative Writing Exercises for Fiction Authors

Story Title Generator

Pen Name Generator

Character Name Generator

After you submit to a writing competition in 2024

It’s exciting to send a piece of writing off to a contest. However, once the initial excitement wears off, you may be left waiting for a while. Some writing contests will contact all entrants after the judging period — whether or not they’ve won. Other writing competitions will only contact the winners. 

Here are a few things to keep in mind after you submit:

Many writing competitions don’t have time to respond to each entrant with feedback on their story. However, it never hurts to ask! Feel free to politely reach out requesting feedback — but wait until after the selection period is over.

If you’ve submitted the same work to more than one writing competition or literary magazine, remember to withdraw your submission if it ends up winning elsewhere.

After you send a submission, don’t follow it up with a rewritten or revised version. Instead, ensure that your first version is thoroughly proofread and edited. If not, wait until the next edition of the contest or submit the revised version to other writing contests.

Find the perfect editor for your next book

Over 1 million authors trust the professionals on Reedsy, come meet them.

1 million authors trust the editors on Reedsy, come meet them.

Reedsy Marketplace UI

1 million authors trust the professionals on Reedsy, come meet them.

Enter your email or get started with a social account:

THE FILIPINO SCRIBE

Tag: writing competitions philippines 2021

Poetry competition focusing on the importance of preserving Philippine languages launched

Poetry competition focusing on the importance of preserving Philippine languages launched

  • Carmen Nacaya
  • August 27, 2021

Almond Press

  • Writing Competitions
  • Journals and Literary Magazines Accepting Submissions
  • Dystopian Short Story Example
  • Privacy Statement
  • Cookie Policy
  • Terms and Conditions

Writing Competitions – Weekly Updates

Opportunities for aspiring and experienced writers..

Welcome to the most comprehensive list of writing competitions available online. Our list includes short story , poetry , and flash fiction competitions, as well as some events for essay writers, screenwriting , and even entire novel manuscripts. Each item on our list includes basic information about max word count , entry fees , submission deadlines , and the first place prize .

Please do your own research before deciding to enter any event. In case of questions about a particular event, please reach out to the event organizer .

Use our online form to submit a new event to our list.

We are keen to encourage quality submissions, so suggest writers to check their stories before submitting using Prowritingaid . They have free and paid versions and are the best writing software we know to help improve grammar, readability and check for repetition, ‘sticky’ sentences and suggest alternatives. We also suggest checking out our article about the Best Apps for Creative Writing .

Join our Facebook group for updates Subscribe to our newsletter Add an event

Event Location

International

New Zealand

South Africa

fri 23 feb All Day The Elmbridge Literary Competition 2023-24 Category Multiple categories UK Entry Fee £5 Max word count 1500 Top Prize £250

fri 23 feb All Day FFF Competition Twenty Category Flash Fiction International Entry Fee £3.85 Max word count 300 Top Prize £150

sun 25 feb All Day Stringybark Short Story Award 2024 Category Multiple categories Australia Entry Fee $15 Max word count 1500 Top Prize $556

wed 28 feb All Day WOW! Women on Writing Winter 2024 Flash Fiction Contest Category Flash Fiction International Entry Fee $10 Max word count 750 Top Prize $400

wed 28 feb All Day Next Generation Short Story Awards Category Multiple categories USA Entry Fee $25 Max word count 5000 Top Prize $500

wed 28 feb All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! Memo'd AI-assisted Writing Contest Category Non-fiction International Entry Fee Free Max word count ~500 Top Prize $750

wed 28 feb All Day thu 29 AWP Award Series Annual competition for the publication of new book-length works Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $30 Max word count Depends on category (check organizer's website) Top Prize $5,500 and publication

thu 29 feb All Day Rigel 2024 - Prose, Poetry, Art, or Graphic Novel Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $12.50 Max word count Depends on category (check organizer's website) Top Prize $500 and publication

thu 29 feb All Day The Letter Review Prize for Unpublished Books Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $20 Max word count No limit Top Prize $1000

thu 29 feb All Day Bournemouth Writing Festival - Flash Fiction and Poetry Competition Category Flash Fiction, Poetry UK Entry Fee £5 Max word count 400 (flash fiction), 30 lines (poetry) Top Prize Publication

thu 29 feb All Day Heroica Poetry Prize Open to women and non-binary poets Category Poetry International Entry Fee £2 Max word count No limit Top Prize £125

thu 29 feb All Day The Letter Review Prize for Short Fiction Category Short Fiction International Entry Fee $20 Max word count 5000 Top Prize $1000

thu 29 feb All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! Discourse Monthly Writing Competition: Family Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee Free Max word count 3000 Top Prize Publication

thu 29 feb All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! Voice.club Monthly Flash Fiction Contest Category Short Story International Entry Fee Free Max word count 350 Top Prize $25 USD Amazon Gift Card and Publication

thu 29 feb All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! The Letter Review Prize for Nonfiction Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee Free Max word count 5000 Top Prize $1000 USD

thu 29 feb All Day The Letter Review Prize for Poetry Category Poetry International Entry Fee $15 Max word count 70 lines Top Prize $1000

thu 29 feb All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! Bridge House Annual Anthology Call for New Submissions Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee Free Max word count 5000 Top Prize Publication and royalties

thu 29 feb All Day Edinburgh Short Story Award Category Short Fiction International Entry Fee $10 Max word count 2000 Top Prize £3,000

thu 29 feb All Day Bournemouth Writing Festival - 2024 Writing Prize Category Multiple categories UK Entry Fee £5 Max word count Flash Fiction (400 words), Poetry (30 lines) Top Prize Publication

thu 29 feb All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! Wiingy Future STEM Leaders Scholarship Category Essay USA Entry Fee Free Max word count 600 Top Prize $200

thu 29 feb All Day The 6th Annual Novel Opening Contest by Writerwerx University Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $20 Max word count 1,000 Top Prize $500 cash and $1,000 in editorial service credits from Writerwerx University

thu 29 feb All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! THE CANTERBURY TALES WRITING COMPETITION Category Poetry International Entry Fee Free Max word count 500 Top Prize £300

thu 29 feb All Day Exeter Writers Short Story Competition Category Short Story International Entry Fee £7 Max word count 3,000 Top Prize £700

fri 01 mar All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! PFD Queer Fiction Prize Category Novel International Entry Fee Free Max word count Three chapters and a synopsis Top Prize Representation by the Peters Fraser + Dunlop agency

fri 01 mar 12:00 am wed 24 apr (apr 24) 11:59 pm First Pages Prize 2024 Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $35 Max word count 1250 Top Prize $2000, Developmental Mentorship, Agent Consultation

fri 01 mar All Day The Stella Kupferberg Memorial Short Story Prize Category Short Story International Entry Fee $25 Max word count 750 Top Prize $1000 and a free 10-week course with Gotham Writers

fri 01 mar All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! The Alpine Fellowship Poetry Prize Category Poetry International Entry Fee Free Max word count 500 Top Prize £3,000

fri 01 mar All Day Gutsy Great Novelist Chapter One Prize Category Novel International Entry Fee $20 Max word count First chapter only Top Prize $1,000

fri 01 mar 1:00 am fri 1:00 am Best Short Stories on the Human Impact of Climate Change Category Short Story USA Entry Fee $10 Max word count 3,000 Top Prize $1,000

thu 14 mar All Day NYC Midnight Screenwriting Challenge 2024 Category Screenwriting International Entry Fee $55 Max word count Varies (check with organizer's for details) Top Prize $4,500

fri 15 mar All Day 2024 Perkoff Prize Category Multiple categories Entry Fee $15 Max word count Variable Top Prize $1,000

sat 16 mar All Day The Desmond O’Grady International Poetry Competition 2024 Category Poetry International Entry Fee €3.50 Max word count 40 lines Top Prize €200

mon 18 mar All Day The Free Verse Prize Category Poetry UK Entry Fee £5 Max word count 48 lines Top Prize £500 and publication

sun 31 mar All Day The International Rubery Book Award Category Full Manuscript International Entry Fee €60 Max word count Check with organizer Top Prize £2000

sun 31 mar All Day The Plough Poetry Prize International Poetry Competition Category Poetry International Entry Fee £5 Max word count 40 lines Top Prize £1,000

sun 31 mar All Day The Caterpillar Poetry Prize Category Poetry International Entry Fee €15 Max word count No limit Top Prize €1,000 and a week at Circle of Misse writing retreat

sun 31 mar All Day Minds Shine Bright Seasons Writing Competition Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $5 Max word count Depends on category (check organizer's website) Top Prize $500 and publication

sun 31 mar All Day The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2024 Category Poetry International Entry Fee £10 Max word count 40 lines Top Prize £500

sun 31 mar All Day The E. H. P. Barnard Spring Poetry Prize Category Poetry UK Entry Fee £2 Max word count 400 Top Prize £100 and a poem video, professionally performed, produced and promoted

sun 31 mar All Day New England Readers' Choice Awards Category Novel USA Entry Fee $25 Max word count No limit Top Prize Free class from Becca Syme's Write Better Faster Academy

sun 31 mar 1:00 am sun 1:00 am This event is FREE to enter! Yay! DLJ Monthly Writing Competition Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee Free Max word count 3000 Top Prize Publication

mon 01 apr All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! Wergle Flomp Humor Poetry Contest Category Poetry International Entry Fee Free Max word count 250 lines Top Prize $2,000

mon 01 apr All Day Nimrod Literary Awards Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $23 Max word count Depends on category (check organizer's website) Top Prize $2,000 and publication

mon 01 apr All Day The Rialto Nature and Place Poetry Competition 2024 Category Poetry International Entry Fee £7 Max word count 40 lines Top Prize £1000

sun 07 apr All Day The Brick Lane Bookshop Short Story Prize 2024 Category Short Story International Entry Fee £10 (50 free spaces available for authors on a low income) Max word count 5000 Top Prize £1000 and publication

wed 10 apr All Day The 2024 Mairtín Crawford Awards For Poetry and Short Story Category Multiple categories UK Entry Fee £10 Max word count No limit Top Prize £500 cash prize and a 'Time to Write' package; including a 3 night stay in a hotel in Belfast and four days of dedicated writing space within The Crescent.

sun 14 apr All Day Desperate Literature Short Fiction Prize 2024 Category Short Fiction International Entry Fee €20 Max word count 2000 Top Prize €2000, a week’s stay at the Civitella Ranieri Foundation artists’ residency, manuscript consultation, and meeting with literary agent

tue 16 apr All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! PURORRELATO micro-story contest 2024 Category Short Fiction International Entry Fee Free Max word count 1500 (characters) Top Prize €750

fri 19 apr (apr 19) 12:00 pm sun 21 (apr 21) 11:59 pm Virtual Event Not Quite Write Prize for Flash Fiction Category Flash Fiction International Entry Fee $25 Max word count 500 Top Prize $1,000

mon 22 apr All Day ABR Elizabeth Jolley Short Story Prize Category Short Story International Entry Fee $30 Max word count 5,000 Top Prize $6,000

tue 30 apr All Day Tadpole Press 100-Word Writing Contest Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $15 Max word count 100 Top Prize $2,000

tue 30 apr All Day The SmokeLong Quarterly Award for Flash Fiction Category Full Manuscript International Entry Fee $14 Max word count 1,000 Top Prize $2,500 and publication

tue 30 apr All Day The Creative Writing NZ Short Story Prize Category Short Story New Zealand Entry Fee $9 Max word count 3,000 Top Prize $1,000

tue 30 apr 1:00 am tue 11:59 pm The Ghost Story Supernatural Fiction Award Category Short Story International Entry Fee $20 Max word count 10,000 Top Prize $1,500

wed 01 may All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! Untold Tales Youth Writing Competition Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee Free Max word count 1,000 Top Prize $100 and publication

wed 01 may All Day Tom Howard/John H. Reid Fiction & Essay Contest Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $22 Max word count 6,000 Top Prize $3,500

wed 01 may All Day Cheshire Novel Prize Category Novel International Entry Fee £29 Max word count 5000 Top Prize £1,500

wed 15 may All Day Goldfinch Novel Award 2024 Category Novel International Entry Fee £10 Max word count 5000 Top Prize £300

wed 15 may All Day Montreal International Poetry Prize Category Poetry International Entry Fee $25 Max word count 40 lines Top Prize $20,000

sun 19 may All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! Creative Future Writers’ Award 2024 Category Multiple categories UK Entry Fee Free Max word count Depends on category (check organizer's website) Top Prize Publication + £23,000 worth of prizes in training, mentoring, assessment and coaching

fri 31 may All Day This event is FREE to enter! Yay! Sapere Books Writing Competition Category Synopsis International Entry Fee Free Max word count 2000 Top Prize Contract for a five-book series

fri 31 may All Day 2024 Page Turner Awards Book Award For Indie or Mainstream Published Books Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $40 Max word count Depends on category (check organizer's website) Top Prize Publication and other perks

fri 31 may All Day The Yeovil Literary Prize Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee £5 - £14.50 Max word count Depends on category (check organizer's website) Top Prize £1250

fri 31 may All Day The Restless Books Prize for New Immigrant Writing Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $20 Max word count Depends on category. Check with organizer. Top Prize $10,000 and publication

fri 31 may All Day The Bridport Prize 2024 Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee £11-£24 Max word count Depends on category (check organizer's website) Top Prize £5,000

sat 01 jun All Day Arizona Authors Association Literary Contest Category Multiple categories USA Entry Fee $30-45 Max word count 5000 Top Prize $500

sat 01 jun All Day The 2024 Times-Chicken House Children’s Fiction Competition Category Full Manuscript International Entry Fee £20 Max word count 80,000 Top Prize £10,000 and publishing contract

sun 07 jul All Day North Street Book Prize Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee $79 Max word count 200,000 Top Prize $10,000

mon 08 jul 2:11 pm mon 2:11 pm 2024 HG Wells Short Story Competition Category Short Story International Entry Fee £10 Max word count 5,000 Top Prize £1,000 and publication

sun 21 jul 1:00 am sun 1:00 am Write by the Sea - Writing Competition 2024 Category Multiple categories Ireland Entry Fee €10 Max word count Depends on category (check organizer's website) Top Prize €500

wed 31 jul All Day Anthology Short Story Competition 2024 Category Short Story International Entry Fee €15 Max word count 1500 Top Prize €1000

sat 31 aug All Day Aesthetica Creative Writing Award 2024 Category Multiple categories International Entry Fee £12 - £18 Max word count 2,000 (fiction); 40 lines (poetry) Top Prize £2,500 and publication

sat 31 aug All Day Anthology Personal Memoir Competition 2024 Category memoir International Entry Fee €10 Max word count 1000 Top Prize €500

sat 31 aug All Day Anthology Personal Memoir Competition Category memoir International Entry Fee €15 Max word count 1,500 Top Prize €500 and the chance to see their work published in a future issue of Anthology

mon 30 sep All Day Anthology Flash Fiction Competition 2024 Category Flash Fiction International Entry Fee €12 Max word count 250 Top Prize €300

mon 30 sep All Day Anthology Nature Writing Competition 2024 Category Non-fiction International Entry Fee €10 Max word count 1000 Top Prize €500

mon 30 sep All Day One Page Poetry Contest Category Poetry USA Entry Fee $25 Max word count 300 Top Prize $2,000

tue 01 oct All Day Tom Howard/Margaret Reid Poetry Contest Category Poetry International Entry Fee $22 Max word count 250 lines Top Prize $3,500

thu 31 oct All Day Anthology Poetry Competition 2024 Category Poetry International Entry Fee €18 Max word count 40 lines Top Prize €1000

sat 30 nov All Day Anthology Travel Writing Competition 2024 Category Non-fiction International Entry Fee €15 Max word count 1000 Top Prize €500

Join our Facebook group for updates Subscribe to our email newsletter

Add an event to our list Archive (past events)

Our friends and supporters

Winning Writers Logo

Would you buy us a coffee?

Maintaining this calendar is hard work!

If you’d like to help us keep this resource free of charge, please consider supporting us with a donation of any amount.

button-medium-blue

  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Creating Photo Essays About Community: A Guide to Our Where We Are Contest

Step-by-step directions for depicting what’s memorable and meaningful about groups and the places where they gather.

A group of young people lying on a weathered wooden stage, with their heads resting on one another's stomachs and their arms embracing one another. Some of the people are texting or holding their phones up to take selfies.

By Katherine Schulten

It’s hard not to be inspired by the immersive 2023 photo-essay series Where We Are .

As you scroll through and are introduced to young female wrestlers in India , rappers in Spain , band kids in Ohio and Black debutantes in Detroit , you can’t help but think about the communities you have been a part of — or have noticed in your own neighborhood or school.

That’s why we hope you’ll participate in our new contest , which invites teenagers to use these photo essays as mentor texts to document the local, offline communities that most interest them.

How do you go about that? The steps are outlined below.

Have fun, and if you are submitting to our contest, make sure you do so by March 20.

How to Create Your Photo Essay

Step 1: read the where we are series closely., step 2: decide what local community will be the subject of your photo essay., step 3: take photos that show both the big picture and the small details., step 4: interview members of the community about why it is special., step 5: give your photo essay context via a short written introduction., step 6: write captions for your photos that give new information or add depth or color., step 7: edit all the pieces together and submit..

Immerse yourself in several of these photo essays, using our related activity sheet to help you start to notice and name some of the things that make this series special.

When you’re done, we’ll help you use those same strategies to document the community you have chosen.

Here are free links to the entire series:

1. The Magic of Your First Car 2. At This Mexican Restaurant, Everyone is Family 3. Where the Band Kids Are 4. In This Nigerian Market, Young Women Find a Place of Their Own 5. At Camp Naru, Nobody Is ‘an Outlier’ 6. For Black Debutantes in Detroit, Cotillion Is More Than a Ball 7. At This Wrestling Academy, Indian Girls Are ‘Set Free’ 8. In Seville, Spain, These Young Rappers Come Together to Turn ‘Tears Into Rhymes’ 9. For a Queer Community in Los Angeles, This Public Park Is a Lifeline 10. In Guatemala, a Collective of Young Artists Finds Family Through Film 11. On a Caribbean Island, Young People Find Freedom in ‘Bike Life’ 12. At This Texas Campus Ministry, ‘Inclusive Love’ Is the Mission 13. For Young Arab Americans in Michigan, the Hookah Lounge Feels like Home

A local band and its fans? The kids who hang out at a nearby basketball court? The people who tend a community garden? Your grandpa’s weekly breakfast with old friends at a local diner?

Our related Student Opinion forum will help you brainstorm ideas and then encourage you to detail what’s special about the people and place you choose. Remember that our rules allow you to work with up to three other people on this project, so consider sharing ideas with others to find a project that excites all of you.

Though we will allow you to choose a community you are a part of, we encourage you not to. Approaching a group as an outsider can help you notice and document aspects of that community with relative objectivity, capturing details that insiders may be too close to see.

Once you’ve chosen a group to photograph, begin by introducing yourself to ensure the participants are open to your project. Make sure they understand that, if you are a finalist, the pictures you take may be published on the New York Times website. You should also be sure to get contact information from each member of the group for any follow-up questions.

Next, spend a day or so just observing, noticing how and where the members of this community spend time, what they do together and how they relate to one another. Start to plan your piece, keeping in mind that, via six to eight photos, photo captions and a short introduction, you’ll need to impart the following:

What is this community?

Who is in it?

Where and when does it meet?

How did the community come to be? How does it operate?

Why does it matter to its participants? What is it about the connections people make in this space that makes it special? Why should it matter to viewers?

If there’s one thing to notice about the Where We Are series, it is that the photos and the writing both “zoom out” to provide a big picture and “zoom in” to focus on the meaningful details. If you have followed our related activity sheet , you’ve already noted how individual pieces do that.

You might have also observed that in each photo essay there are images that show the physical space; images that spotlight the people who gather there; and close-up images that focus on meaningful objects or details, like food, clothing, tattoos, jewelry, hair or hands.

Here are some steps you can take to do this too.

1. Ground your piece in a specific physical space.

Keep in mind that our contest allows you to submit only eight photos, so the more specific you can be about the place you choose, the easier it will be to tell a story. For example, rather than trying to document everything about the boys’ soccer team at your school, you might focus on their Wednesday practices at a local field.

Take photos that establish that space, perhaps at different times of day, from a variety of angles, with and without people. Here, for instance, is Sarapes, a Mexican restaurant in a quiet Connecticut suburb that is a “headquarters” for a group of 20-somethings.

As you look at this image and the ones below, ask yourself:

What can you tell about this space from the photograph?

What can you guess about the people who gather here, and what might this place might mean to them? What do you see that makes you say that?

Here is a meeting area at the Texas Wesley Foundation , a Methodist campus ministry group at University of Texas at Austin.

And here is the caption that comes with it:

“We call ourselves a Methodist group, but we are enthusiastic to accept people of other faiths, people who might not have any faith, or who are questioning their faith,” said Brandon. “We really like to meet people where they’re at.”

How do the caption and image echo and build on each other?

Next is one of many shots of Camp Naru , a summer camp for Korean American youth, where fostering a “strong, secure sense of identity and community is one of the main goals.” How can you see that in this image?

Finally, here is a big-picture look at the Southern California landscape that is the setting for “ The Magic of Your First Car .” What adjectives come to mind? Before you read the full piece, what can you already imagine about the teenagers who “get away from the prying eyes of parents” by driving? What additional images might you expect to see in the full essay?

2. Focus on the people who gather there.

Community is all about people, so consider the ways you can document both the ways they come together and the ways they might experience the group individually.

For instance, here is an arresting close-up image from “ For a Queer Community in Los Angeles, This Public Park Is a Lifeline .” What is interesting about it to you? How does the photo speak to the title of the piece?

Here is an image from “ Where the Band Kids Are .” What adjectives would you use to describe this community based on what you see here?

Here is another group shot. What adjectives would you use to describe this community? What would you expect individual portraits of its members to show?

Now, look at the related photo essay to see how close your answers were.

Here are some of the people that call Sarapes , the Mexican restaurant, their refuge. Action shots like this one often tell a viewer more than posed photos. What does this one say to you?

Finally, here is an image from “ On a Caribbean Island, Young People Find Freedom in ‘Bike Life.’ ” Though we don’t see any faces, the composition of the photo tells us a great deal. What do you think is going on here? What do you see that makes you say that? After you make your guesses, click into the photo essay and see how accurate your ideas were.

3. Zoom in on telling details about the people and the place.

You looked at a “zoomed out” image above from “ The Magic of Your First Car .” Here is a close-up. What does it tell you? What compositional elements give you that information? Why do you think the photographer chose this focus?

If you’ve already looked at several of the photo essays, you may have noticed that many, like this one, contain close-ups of hands. Why do you think that is?

Next, can you guess which photo essay the image below is from?

Before we reveal the answer, here is another close-up from the same photo essay, this one taken at night. Are you getting warmer?

Answer: “ At Camp Naru, Nobody Is ‘an Outlier.’ ” If you got it right, what clues in the photos helped? How do the images echo the idea expressed in the title?

Below is a photo that focuses on one member of a queer community in Los Angeles . What do you notice? What do you admire about the composition, the lighting, the angle or anything else? Why?

Now let’s look at a big-picture image and a close-up to see how they work together. Here is a shot from “ For Black Debutantes in Detroit, Cotillion Is More Than a Ball .”

Finally, here is a close-up. What do the two tell you together? What would be missing if you only took one type of shot?

4. Don’t forget to experiment and have fun.

If you’ve mastered the ideas above, now it’s time to play. As you worked through the images, you asked yourself, “How does composition convey meaning?” even if you didn’t realize that was what you were doing.

Our detailed photo guide , developed for an earlier contest, encourages you to think about how to experiment with basic composition techniques like rule of thirds, angle, depth of field, leading lines, framing and distance. It also helps you think about lighting, color and cropping, as well as making the best use of the tools available on most smartphones.

Read through it before and after you have documented your community and then look through the images you have taken. Do you have enough variety? Can you identify techniques like rule of thirds and leading lines in the images from the Where We Are series? If you haven’t used them in your own work, could you experiment?

Below are a few more images from Where We Are essays for inspiration. What do you notice? What compositional choices did the photographer make? How would different choices change the meaning?

Last question: Two of the four images above are from the same photo essay. Which are they, which piece do they come from, and how did you know? What unites the two images?

According to the rules of our contest, you only need one quote from a member of the community you have chosen, but, of course, you are allowed to use many more. We encourage you to weave them into both your captions and your introduction, just as the authors of the Where We Are series did.

Never conducted an interview before? We have advice. Scroll down to Steps 3 and 4 in this guide we created for our Profile Contest to find many practical tips from Times journalists for preparing for and conducting an interview.

But to start, you just need a few good questions. For example, you might ask:

What’s special about this community for you?

What do you like to do here?

What are some of your favorite memories or stories about this group?

What would an outsider to this community not understand or notice?

Is there history about this place or these people that I should understand?

If you were photographing this community, what important places, objects or moments would you try to capture? Why?

Finally, many journalists end interviews with this question: “Is there anything I didn’t ask that you wish I did?” Sometimes the most interesting information is elicited that way!

Then look over what you wrote down and choose the best quotes. Maybe they give information that your photo essay needs, maybe they are colorful and show personality or maybe they do all of those things.

To see how this works, we’ll look at one of the essays, “ At This Texas Campus Ministry, ‘Inclusive Love’ Is the Mission .”

Here is how the first quote was used, in the introduction:

Sydney had grown up Methodist and thought she knew what to expect from a Christian student organization. But she was surprised by just how welcoming the Wesley was. The students and adult leaders seemed genuinely invested in drawing her out of her shell and getting to know her, with no agenda. “It’s really not about getting people into this religion,” she said. “It’s just about being a community who supports others and loves others. And that was huge to me.”

How does it both paraphrase Sydney’s words and directly quote her? What does that quote tell the reader up front about this community? Why is that information important, and why might a participant’s own words be a compelling way to express this?

Later we meet Ethan. What does his experience — again, both paraphrased and directly quoted — add to your understanding of the inclusivity of this community? What colorful description does he offer for what happens in this group? How does this description add information to what is depicted in the photos?

Ethan’s parents are Buddhist and were surprised when their son started spending so much time with a Methodist organization. For his part, Ethan describes himself as agnostic and says he hasn’t felt any pressure from the Wesley to change that, but he appreciates the camaraderie the group offers. “There was this one worship where, when there was a swell in the music, someone burst into tears, and then they hugged one of their friends. I am not sure what was going on there, but it was definitely a very profound experience,” he said.

Listen for the same things as you interview. How can one person’s description of an experience add necessary information, depth, history or background to what you have depicted in images? Did you get any quotes that are too good not to use? How could you highlight them? Do they belong in your introduction or as a photo caption?

The essays in the Where We Are series are longer than the introductions you will write if you are participating in this contest. Many of those essays are about 600 words, double what we have allowed student participants. (You have up to 300 words, but you can use fewer if you can still convey what you need to.)

But you can use the first few paragraphs of each essay — what appears before the first photos — as mentor texts for your own introductions, and we’ll show you how, below.

First though, let’s remember your broader goals. As we wrote at the top of this post, together, your introduction, photo essay and captions should answer these questions:

Why does it matter to its participants? Why should it matter to viewers?

Take a look at “ In This Nigerian Market, Young Women Find a Place of Their Own ” as an example. Here is the introduction, the first 200 or so words before the photo essay begins to scroll:

At the bustling Yaba Market in Lagos, Nigeria, there is something for everyone. Chatter rises from the traders, whose stalls sprawl over miles of cracked gray concrete and packed earth. They might be selling baskets of fresh fruit, wheelbarrows stuffed with phone cases, piles of sequined fabrics or racks of second-hand clothes. If you’re lucky, you might find a vintage jacket you’ve been searching for, or a pair of long-lasting Levi’s jeans. But you’re never going to be as lucky as Dencity : the coolest of the cool kids of Lagos. These skaters, often clad in a uniform of baggy pants and crop tops, head to the market to go thrifting each week. They’re armed with fashion knowledge only the young, fun and determined can possess and seek out the best streetwear they can find. Founded by 26-year-old Blessing Ewona in 2020 in response to the dearth of spaces for young queer people and female skaters in Nigeria, Dencity skate, dream and thrift together. From their trips to the market to regular skate meet-ups at the dilapidated National Stadium or Tarkwa Bay beach, they have traced their own map of the city.

How many of the questions we listed above do these paragraphs answer? How do they work with the top image, which we’ve embedded above this section? What descriptions stand out? What context and background does it provide?

Now let’s break your task down.

1. Make your writing as vivid and varied as your images.

Much of the writing in these essays is just as interesting as the photos, as the example above shows. Here is another, the opening of “ At This Wrestling Academy, Indian Girls Are ‘Set Free’ ”:

As the winter sun ascends over a mustard farm, pale orange bleeding into sharp yellow, a line of 36 girls all dressed alike — T-shirts, track pants, crew cuts — emerges into an open field, rubbing sleep from their eyes. Under a tin shed, they sit on their haunches, bent over stone mortars. For the next 20 minutes, they crush raw almonds into a fine paste, straining out a bottle of nut milk. They will need it to regain their strength.

And here is how “ On a Caribbean Island, Young People Find Freedom in ‘Bike Life’ ” begins:

On a warm evening in October 2021, Enzo Crispin mounted his cobalt motorcycle and set off into the night. Hundreds of others joined his caravan, the rumbles of their engines filling the air of Fort-de-France, the capital of the French Caribbean island territory of Martinique. The riders popped up on one wheel, stood up on their bikes, brushed their hands along the ground — all while zooming along at top speed. Completely exhilarating. Potentially illegal, at least on public streets. This is “cabrage,” which roughly translates from French as a rodeo on wheels.

How do these introductions both “zoom out” and “zoom in”? How do they play on your senses, helping you see, hear, taste, touch and smell this place and what happens in it? How could you do those things in your introduction?

2. Offer background to help viewers understand what they are seeing and what it means.

Here is the introduction to “ For Young Arab Americans in Michigan, the Hookah Lounge Feels Like Home ”:

Coming of age is marked by a series of firsts. Your first kiss. Your first job. Your first drink. Many who grew up in Dearborn, Mich., would add to the list: your first hookah. Located just outside downtown Detroit, Dearborn is home to one of the United States’ largest Arab American communities: Nearly 50 percent of residents identify as having Arab ancestry, according to the U.S. census . Middle Eastern shops, where you may find portable hookah cups , dot the streets. There is also the Arab American National Museum (which sells hookah-themed socks) and the Islamic Center of America , one of the nation’s oldest and largest mosques. And then there is the long list of hookah lounges, where locals spend hours leisurely smoking flavored tobacco through water pipes while catching up, watching soccer games or enjoying a live Arabic music performance. “A spot like a hookah lounge, it’s sacred,” particularly for immigrants and refugees far from home, said Marrim (pronounced Mariam) Akashi Sani, 25, who is Iraqi-Iranian. “And it’s something you have to create for yourself when you’re displaced, and you might not ever be able to go back home because you don’t really know what home is anymore.”

How do the opening two lines grab your attention? How does the demographic information in the third paragraph explain the focus on hookah lounges? How does the quote at the end offer important information that complements the demographic data and gives it meaning?

Next is the introduction to “ For Black Debutantes in Detroit, Cotillion Is More Than a Ball ”:

In a heady swirl of bright white silk and lace, the young ladies of the Cotillion Society of Detroit Educational Foundation are presented as debutantes. The Society’s annual ball is the culmination of eight months of etiquette lessons, leadership workshops, community service projects and cultural events. As the girls take to the dance floor, they become part of a legacy of Black debutantes in the city and beyond. Debutante balls, which traditionally helped girls from high society find suitable husbands, emerged from Europe in the 18th century. Black Americans have adopted a unique version of them since at least 1895 . Responding to the politics of the Jim Crow era, these balls, which emphasized women’s education, echoed the work of the racial upliftment movement and women’s clubs, said Taylor Bythewood-Porter, the curator of a recent exhibition on Black cotillions at the California African American Museum. Organizers saw the balls as a way to “dismiss the idea of Black people not being smart enough, or good enough, or worthy enough.” For today’s debutantes, many of whom grew up in predominantly white neighborhoods of Detroit, gaining an informal network of Black adult mentors was “life-changing,” said Sage Johnson, 17. “Signing up for debutantes, I thought it was just one big ball. But there were a lot more layers to it.”

How do the second and third paragraphs add key context and history to this photo essay? How does the quote at the end bring these cotillions into the 21st century, and help you anticipate what is to come?

Ask yourself, What background will my viewers need to understand what they are seeing, and appreciate its nuances? Do I need to add that information myself, or can some of the quotes from participants do that work for me?

In most traditional newspaper articles, you will find a caption under each photo explaining more detail about the image and its relationship to the story. As you scroll through Where We Are, however, you’ve probably noticed that, thanks to the elegant way these pieces are produced, the captions float up on or around the photos.

In these essays, the captions continue the story. Your captions will do that too. But in the Where We Are pieces, photo captions are interspersed with more of the written essay. Because you are doing a “mini” version of this project, however, after your initial introduction, the only writing we will read will come from your captions. Make sure they continue to tell your story in a way that makes sense to the reader and helps build meaning.

For instance, here is an image from “ In Guatemala, A Collective of Young Artists Finds Family Through Film .”

The caption?

The team has quickly become a family, meeting up for dinners and to celebrate each other’s birthdays. They are, said Sebastián, a community first and a production house second.

Notice how those words work with the image. Can you see “family” and “community” and “team” conveyed in the way this image is composed, the looks on the faces, the colors and light? How?

Here is another example, from “ In Seville, Spain, These Young Rappers Come Together to Turn ‘Tears Into Rhymes’ .” Before you read the caption, what do you imagine is happening in this picture?

Here is the caption, which both offers some background about the group and includes a wonderful quote:

Luis Rodríguez Collado, at right, the youngest of the group, grew up in Spain, the child of Mexican immigrants. “We aren’t just emoting with language, but with song and dance, with sounds and rhythm,” said Luis, a.k.a. Luis 3K. “At 19, I sincerely don’t know anything more liberating than this.”

As you construct your captions, ask yourself:

What information do I need to add to these images to make the meaning and nuances clear?

Can using quotes from participants work? What might they add?

How do these captions continue the story I started in my introduction? Do they build on one another and make sense both separately and together? Do they avoid repetition, with each other or with the introduction? Do they strengthen the key ideas of my piece? How?

At this point you may have dozens of images, and pages of notes. How do you put it all together?

Way back when you were first analyzing the Where We Are series, we called your attention to the fact that the images, essay and captions don’t repeat information exactly the same way . Each element adds something new.

We also talked about how, from the very first image, the one the authors chose for the top, a theme is hinted at, and then echoed in the introduction and continued in the captions. Whatever key ideas about this community you want to get across — maybe that it is a refuge or home, that it offers freedom or that it challenges participants creatively or athletically — look through your images and writing and find all the ways you think you have done that. Do you need more emphasis on this theme? A variety of ways of showing it?

Speaking of variety , that’s another lens to look through when considering your piece as a whole. In terms of both the photos and the writing, have you “zoomed out” enough to establish a place and a context? Have you “zoomed in” to show detail? Are your images taken from different angles and points of view? Do they show both the group and individuals? Are they dynamic and interesting and surprising?

Then, show your work to others, and, perhaps, ask them to analyze it using the last four questions on our related activity sheet . That will prompt them to tell you what is working, but make sure to also ask them if there is anything confusing about your piece, or if they think there is information missing.

Then, go back and fill in anything your piece needs, and play with the sequence of your images until they tell the story you want to tell.

Good luck. We can’t wait to see the results!

Katherine Schulten has been a Learning Network editor since 2006. Before that, she spent 19 years in New York City public schools as an English teacher, school-newspaper adviser and literacy coach. More about Katherine Schulten

IMAGES

  1. 27 Writing Competitions For High School Students In 2021

    writing competitions philippines 2021

  2. Writing Maniacs has come up with writing contest "Poetry Contest 2021

    writing competitions philippines 2021

  3. POD empowers discipline through Filipino Essay Writing Contest

    writing competitions philippines 2021

  4. 21 Writing Competitions for 2021

    writing competitions philippines 2021

  5. First Songwriting Competition-2021

    writing competitions philippines 2021

  6. LUTC Writing Competition 2021

    writing competitions philippines 2021

COMMENTS

  1. FILIPINO PRIDEESSAY WRITING CONTEST

    FILIPINO PRIDE ESSAY WRITING CONTEST Theme: "WHY I AM PROUD TO BE A FILIPINO" The competition is to encourage more Filipinos to write positive stories about our people and the country. The contest is divided into two sections the Student and Open categories.

  2. A new contest and other literary matters

    "Deadline for submission of entries is June 20, 2021, 11:59 p.m. PST. The contest is open to all Filipino citizens and former Filipino vitezens of all ages. PNU must receive the submission via...

  3. PCC Essay Writing Contest

    PCC Essay Writing Contest - Philippine Competition Commission. Philippine Standard Time: Sunday, February 11, 2024, 6:28:31 AM.

  4. Gawad LIRA 2021 Poetry Writing Contest now open for entries

    Linangan sa Imahen, Retorika, at Anyo (LIRA) celebrates National Language Month with Gawad LIRA 2021, a contest that aims to give poets writing in the Filipino language an opportunity to showcase their flair for Filipino poetry and receive recognition and reward for their work. This contest also aims to promote and enrich Filipino poetry.

  5. Pisay student Natalia Araña wins The New York Times' essay writing contest

    Photo from Natalia Araña FB, PSHS. Philippine Science High School (PSHS) Grade 11 student Natalia Araña has won The Learning Network's Second Annual STEM Writing Contest organized by The New York Times for her essay, "Mycowood Violins: A Different Kind of Time Machine.". Araña was named one of the eleven international winners of the ...

  6. CONTEST: Filipino Writers' Prize worth Php250k now accepting entries

    NCCA photo. The contest for the 2023 Filipino Writers' Prize worth Php250,000 is now accepting entries for the biennial award given out by the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA). The award in the gross amount of PHP 250,000 will assist the winner during the writing stage of the project.

  7. 14-year-old Filipino teen wins 1st place at Oxford University Press

    Charles Samuel Vitug, a 14-year-old Filipino, won first place at the Oxford University Press Story Writing Competition for 2021 for the 12-14 year old age group for his piece titled "". The teenager shared that he came up with the story from his own experience of experiencing a writer's block, and how he managed to overcome the challenge.

  8. National Competition on Storybook Writing

    National Competition on Storybook Writing. 24,219 likes · 340 talking about this. We are giving teachers the platform to showcase their talents in...

  9. Gawad Lira 2021 poetry writing contest now accepting entries

    October 31, 2021. 4:35 pm. Linangan sa Imahen, Retorika, at Anyo (Lira) celebrates National Language Month with Gawad Lira 2021, a contest that aims to give poets writing in the Filipino language ...

  10. April 4, 2022 DA 027, s. 2022

    #ForYouPilipinas2022 Essay Writing Contest DA_s2022_027 Recent DepEd Orders JANUARY 26, 2024 DO 002, S. 2024 - Immediate Removal of Administrative Tasks of Public School Teachers

  11. 2024 Free-Entry International Writing Contests

    Look no further if you're searching for writing competitions to participate in. Herein, you'll find an updated list of writing contests that are free to enter, covering essays, poetry, short story, and creative nonfiction, just to name but a few.

  12. Handwriting a letter can win you up to ₱25,000

    The Philippine Post Office (PHLPost) and the Universal Postal Union (UPU), through the International Bureau, invites youth ages nine to 15 to join its 51st International Letter Writing Competition for Young People, to strengthen literacy through the art of letter-writing.

  13. Letter-writing competition unfolds for young Filipinos

    THE Philippine Postal Corporation (PHLPost) and the Universal Postal Union (UPU) based in Berne, Switzerland, recently launched the 50th International Letter-Writing Competition (2021) for the ...

  14. 61 Writing Contests in December 2021

    Invisible City Nonfiction Flash Contest 2021. Genre: Flash nonfiction, 750 words max. Prize: $500. Deadline: December 5, 2021. J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award. Genre: Nonfiction book ...

  15. Applications for 2023 NCCA Writers' Prize with P250,000 grant are now

    In a Facebook post, the NCCA said it would choose five writers, one each in the categories of poetry (Ibaloi), novel (Filipino), essay/creative nonfiction (Bikol), short story (Pangasinense), and drama (Cebuano). Chosen applicants will be granted P250,000 each to assist them as they finish their writing project in a year's time.

  16. 42 Writing Competitions for 2021

    The aim of the Desperate Literature Short Fiction Prize is both to celebrate the best of new short fiction and to give winners the most visibility possible for their writing. Max word count is 2000 and there is an entry fee of €20 to enter. Winners will receive €1000. The deadline for submissions is 15th April 2021.

  17. PDF Department of Education

    Writing Competition and Judging on August 27, 2021 at Silid Ugnayan, Division of Cavite. 2. Top 10 will be selected and declared as winners from the categories such as Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grade 2 and Grade 3 levels but only the Top 8 will attend to the cliniquing on September 2021 (specific date to be announced thru a separate

  18. 2020 NSPC Individual Writing Contest Guidelines

    2. Sports Writing: a. The NTWG shall orient and provide final instructions to the contestants before the contest proper. b. A pre-game conference shall be conducted for the introduction of the players, coaches, and tournament officials. c. Contestants shall watch an actual game where they can gather adequate data. d.

  19. The Ultimate List of Writing Contests in 2024 • Win Cash Prizes!

    The Ultimate List of Writing Contests in 2024 • Win Cash Prizes! The Best Writing Contests of 2024 Writing competitions curated by Reedsy Genre All Children's Christian Crime Essay Fantasy Fiction Flash Fiction Horror Humor LGBTQ Memoir Mystery Non-fiction Novel Novella Poetry Romance Science Fiction Science Writing Script Writing Short Story

  20. writing competitions philippines 2021

    writing competitions philippines 2021. Tag: writing competitions philippines 2021. education; Poetry competition focusing on the importance of preserving Philippine languages launched. Carmen Nacaya; August 27, 2021; 0; FOLLOW US! Like; Follow; Follow; Connect; Follow; Follow; ABOUT THE OWNER

  21. Winners of the first-ever CFO Himigrasyon Songwriting Contest

    The CFO would also like to thank and congratulate all the participants who showed their true passion and poured their hearts out in writing their entries. For more information on the 2021 Himigrasyon Song Writing Contest, please contact the Secretariat at telephone numbers +632 8-552-4766 to 767 and email [email protected].

  22. Writing Competitions

    Welcome to the most comprehensive list of writing competitions available online. Our list includes short story, poetry, and flash fiction competitions, as well as some events for essay writers, screenwriting, and even entire novel manuscripts.

  23. August 13, 2021 DA 043, s. 2021

    Recent DepEd Orders. JANUARY 26, 2024 DO 002, S. 2024 - Immediate Removal of Administrative Tasks of Public School Teachers; JANUARY 15, 2024 DO 001, S. 2024 - Revocation of DepEd Order No. 023, s. 2023 (Assumption of Authority of the Department of Education Over the 14 Public Schools Affected by the Supreme Court Decision in G.R. No. 235316) Pursuant to the Memorandum of Agreement Between ...

  24. Creating Photo Essays About Community: A Guide to Our Where We Are Contest

    Here are some steps you can take to do this too. 1. Ground your piece in a specific physical space. Keep in mind that our contest allows you to submit only eight photos, so the more specific you ...