• Extremes and Natural Hazards
  • Adaptation Science
  • Earth Data Across Scales
  • Earth Data Science Education
  • Earth Analytics
  • Landscape Dynamics
  • Partnerships
  • Earth Analytics Professional Certificate
  • Environmental Data Science Seminar Series
  • Post Docs and Graduate Students
  • Earth Data Science Corps
  • How to Engage
  • Learning Portal

How to Write a Good Cover Letter for a Research Position

Writing a cover letter can be intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be!

Some people believe cover letters are a science. Others seem to think they are more akin to black magic. Regardless of how you feel about cover letters, they are one of the most important parts of the job application process. Your resume or CV may get you an interview, but a good cover letter is what ensures that the hiring manager reads your resume in the first place.

Writing a cover letter for any job is important, but the art of writing a good cover letter for a research position can make or break your application. While writing a cover letter for a research position, you have to walk a fine line of proving your expertise and passion while limiting jargon and dense language.

In this post, we will explain cover letter writing basics, and then dive into how to write a research specific cover letter with examples of both good and bad practices.

hands typing on blank google doc

What Is A Cover Letter and Why Do Cover Letters Matter?

A cover letter is your opportunity to tell a story and connect the dots of your resume. Resumes and curriculum vitae (CVs) are often cold and static—they don’t show any sort of character that will give companies a hint about if you will fit in with their culture. 

Your cover letter gives you the chance to demonstrate that you are an interesting, qualified, and intelligent person. Without proving that you are worth the time to interview, a company or research organization will set your application in the rejection pile without giving it a second look. 

So, what is a cover letter, exactly? It is an explanation (written out in paragraph form) of what you can bring to the company that goes beyond the information in your resume. Cover letters give a company a glimpse into the qualities that will make you the ideal candidate for their opening. 

Note that a cover letter is not the same as a letter of intent. A cover letter is written for a specific job opening. For example, if I got an email saying that the University of Colorado was looking for a tenure track faculty member to teach GEO 1001, and I chose to apply, I would write a cover letter. 

A letter of intent, however, is written regardless of the job opening. It is intended to express an interest in working at a particular company or with a particular group. The goal of a letter of intent is to demonstrate your interest in the company (or whatever type of group you are appealing to) and illustrate that you are willing to work with them in whatever capacity they feel is best. 

For example, if I loved the clothing company, Patagonia and wanted to work there, I could write a letter of intent. They may have an opening for a sales floor associate, but after reading my application and letter of intent, decide I would be better suited to a design position. Or, they may not have any positions open at all, but choose to keep my resume on hand for the next time they do. 

Most organizations want a cover letter, not a letter of intent, so it is important to make sure your cover letter caters to the specifics of the job posting. A cover letter should also demonstrate why you want to work at the company, but it should be primarily focused on why you can do the job better than any of the other applicants.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter: The Basics 

Writing a cover letter isn’t hard. Writing a good cover letter, a cover letter that will encourage a hiring manager to look at your application and schedule an interview, is more difficult (but certainly not impossible). Below, we will go over each of the important parts of a cover letter: the salutation, introduction, body, and conclusion, as well as some other best practices.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Salutation

Don’t start with “Dear Sir/Ma’am” (or any iteration of a vague greeting, including “to whom it may concern”). Avoiding vague greetings is the oldest trick in the book, but it still holds a lot of weight. Starting a cover letter with the above phrase is pretty much stamping “I didn’t bother to research this company at all because I am sending out a million generic cover letters” across your application. It doesn’t look good. 

The best practice is to do your research and use your connections to find a name. “Dear Joe McGlinchy” means a lot more than “Dear Hiring Manager.” LinkedIn is a great tool for this—you can look up the company, then look through the employees until you find someone that seems like they hire for the relevant department. 

The most important thing about the salutation is to address a real human. By selecting someone in the company, you’ve demonstrated that you’ve done some research and are actually interested in this company specifically. Generic greetings aren’t eye-catching and don’t do well.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Introduction

Once you’ve addressed your cover letter to a real human being, you need a powerful introduction to prove that this cover letter is worth the time it will take to read. This means that you need a hook. 

Your first sentence needs to be a strong starter, something to encourage the hiring manager not only to continue reading the cover letter, but to look at your application as well. If you have a contact in the company, you should mention them in the first sentence. Something along the lines of “my friend, Amanda Rice (UX/UI manager), suggested I apply for the natural language processing expert position after we worked together on a highly successful independent project.” 

The example above uses a few techniques. The name drop is good, but that only works if you actually have a connection in the company. Beyond that, this example has two strengths. First, it states the name of the position. This is important because hiring managers can be hiring for several different positions at a time, and by immediately clarifying which position you are applying for, you make their job a little bit easier.  Next, this sentence introduces concrete skills that apply to the job. That is a good way to start because it begins leading into the body, where you will go into depth about how exactly your experience and skills make you perfect for the job. 

Another technique for a strong lead-in to a cover letter is to begin with an applicable personal experience or anecdote. This attracts more attention than stereotypical intros (like the example above), but you have to be careful to get to the point quickly. Give yourself one or two sentences to tell the story and prove your point before you dive into your skills and the main body of the cover letter.

A more standard technique for introductions is simply expressing excitement. No matter how you choose to start, you want to demonstrate that you are eager about the position, and there is no easier way to do that than just saying it. This could take the form of “When I saw the description for X job on LinkedIn, I was thrilled: it is the perfect job for my Y skills and Z experience.” This option is simple and to-the-point, which can be refreshing for time-crunched hiring managers. 

Since we’ve provided a few good examples, we will offer a bad example, so you can compare and contrast. Don’t write anything along the line of: “My name is John Doe, and I am writing to express my interest in the open position at your company.” 

There are a few issues here. First, they can probably figure out your name. You don’t need that to be in the first sentence (or any of the sentences—the closing is an obvious enough spot). Next, “the open position” and “your company” are too generic. That sounds like the same cover letter you sent to every single employer in a hundred mile radius. Give the specifics! Finally, try to start with a little more spice. Add in some personality, something to keep the hiring manager reading. If you bore them to death in the first line, they aren’t going to look over your resume and application with the attention they deserve. 

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Body

So, you’ve addressed a real human being, and you’ve snagged their attention with a killer opening line. What next? Well, you have to hold on to that attention by writing an engaging and informative cover letter body. 

The body of a cover letter is the core of the important information you want to transmit. The introduction’s job was to snag the attention of the hiring manager. The body’s job is to sell them on your skills.  There are a few formatting things to be aware of before we start talking about what content belongs in the body of the cover letter. First, keep the company culture and standards in mind when picking a format. For example, if I want to work for a tech startup that is known for its wit and company culture, I can probably get away with using a bulleted list or another informal format. However, if I am applying to a respected research institution, using a standard five paragraph format is best. 

In addition, the cover letter should not be longer than a page. Hiring managers are busy people. They may have hundreds of resumes to read, so they don’t need a three page essay per person. A full page is plenty, and many hiring managers report finding three hundred words or less to be the idea length. Just to put that into context, the text from here to the “How to Write a Good Cover Letter Body” header below is about perfect, length-wise. 

Now, on to the more important part: the content. A cover letter should work in tandem with a resume. If you have a list of job experiences on your resume, don’t list them again in the cover letter. Use the valuable space in the cover letter to give examples about how you have applied your skills and experience. 

For example, if I have worked as a barista, I wouldn’t just say “I have worked as a barista at Generic Cafe.” The hiring manager could learn that from my resume. Instead, I could say “Working as a barista at Generic Cafe taught me to operate under pressure without feeling flustered. Once…” I would go on to recount a short story that illustrated my ability to work well under pressure. It is important that the stories and details you choose to include are directly related to the specific job. Don’t ramble or add anything that isn’t obviously connected. Use the job description as a tool—if it mentions a certain skill a few times, make sure to include it!

If you can match the voice and tone of your cover letter to the voice of the company, that usually earns you extra points. If, in their communications, they use wit, feel free to include it in your letter as well. If they are dry, to the point, and serious, cracking jokes is not the best technique.

A Few Don’ts of Writing a Cover Letter Body   

There are a few simple “don’ts” in cover letter writing. Do not: 

  • Bad: I am smart, dedicated, determined, and funny.
  • Better: When I was working at Tech Company, I designed and created an entirely new workflow that cut the product delivery time in half. 
  • Bad: When I was seven, I really loved the monkeys at the zoo. This demonstrates my fun-loving nature. 
  • Better: While working for This Company, I realized I was far more productive if I was light-hearted. I became known as the person to turn to in my unit when my coworkers needed a boost, and as my team adopted my ideology, we exceeded our sales goals by 200%. 
  • Bad: I would love this job because it would propel me to the next stage of my career.
  • Better: With my decade of industry experience communicating with engineers and clients, I am the right person to manage X team. 
  • Bad: I know I’m not the most qualified candidate for this job, but…
  • Better: I can apply my years of experience as an X to this position, using my skills in Y and Z to… 
  • Bad: I am a thirty year old white woman from Denver…
  • Better: I have extensive experience managing diverse international teams, as illustrated by the time I…  

The most important part of the cover letter is the body. Sell your skills by telling stories, but walk the razor’s edge between saying too much and not enough. When in doubt, lean towards not enough—it is better for the hiring manager to call you in for an interview to learn more than to bore them.

How to Write a Good Cover Letter Conclusion

 The last lines of a cover letter are extremely important. Until you can meet in-person for an interview, the conclusion of your cover letter will greatly affect the impression the hiring manager has of you. A good technique for concluding your cover letter is to summarize, in a sentence, what value you can bring to the company and why you are perfect for the position. Sum up the most important points from your cover letter in a short, concise manner. 

Write with confidence, but not arrogance. This can be a delicate balance. While some people have gotten away (and sometimes gotten a job) with remarks like, “I’ll be expecting the job offer soon,” most do not. Closing with a courteous statement that showcases your capability and skills is far more effective than arrogance. Try to avoid trite or generic statements in the closing sentence as well. This includes the template, “I am very excited to work for XYZ Company.” Give the hiring manager something to remember and close with what you can offer the company. 

The final step in any cover letter is to edit. Re-read your cover letter. Then, set it aside for a few hours (or days, time permitting) and read it again. Give it to a friend to read. Read it aloud. This may seem excessive, but there is nothing more off-putting than a spelling or grammar error in the first few lines of a cover letter. The hiring manager may power through and ignore it, but it will certainly taint their impression. 

Once the cover letter is as flawless and compelling as it can be, send it out! If you are super stuck on how to get started, working within a template may help. Microsoft Word has many free templates that are aesthetically appealing and can give you a hint to the length and content. A few good online options live here (free options are at the bottom—there is no reason to pay for a resume template).

How to Write a Cover Letter for a Research Position

Writing a cover letter for a research position is the same as writing any other cover letter. There are, however, a few considerations and additions that are worth pointing out. A job description may not directly ask for a cover letter, but it is good practice to send one unless they specifically say not to. This means that even if a cover letter isn’t mentioned, you should send one—it is best practice and gives you an opportunity to expand on your skills and research in a valuable way.

Format and Writing Style for a Research Position Cover Letter

Research and academics tend to appreciate formality more than start-ups or tech companies, so using the traditional five paragraph format is typically a good idea. The five paragraph format usually includes an introduction, three short examples of skills, and a concluding paragraph. This isn’t set in stone—if you’d rather write two paragraphs about the skills and experience you bring to the company, that is fine. 

Keep in mind that concise and to-the-point writing is extremely valuable in research. Anyone who has ever written a project proposal under 300 words knows that every term needs to add value. Proving that you are a skilled writer, starting in your cover letter, will earn you a lot of points. This means that cover letters in research and academia, though you may have more to say, should actually be shorter than others. Think of the hiring manager—they are plowing through a massive stack of verbose, technical, and complex cover letters and CVs. It is refreshing to find an easy to read, short cover letter. 

On the “easy to read” point, remember that the hiring manager may not be an expert in your field. Even if they are, you cannot assume that they have the exact same linguistic and educational background as you. For example, if you have dedicated the last five years of your life to studying a certain species of bacteria that lives on Red-Eyed Tree Frogs, all of those technical terms you have learned (and maybe even coined) have no place in your cover letter. Keep jargon to an absolute minimum. Consider using a tool like the Hemingway Editor to identify and eliminate jargon. While you want to reduce jargon, it is still important to prove that you’ve researched their research. Passion about the research topic is one of the most valuable attributes that a new hire can offer. 

Use your cover letter to prove that you have done your homework, know exactly what the institution or group is doing, and want to join them. If you have questions about the research or want to learn more, it isn’t a bad idea to get in touch with one of the researchers. You can often use LinkedIn or the group’s staff site to learn who is working on the project and reach out.

What Research Information Should be Included in a Cover Letter

A research position cover letter is not the place for your academic history, dissertation, or publications. While it may be tempting to go into detail about the amazing research you did for your thesis, that belongs in your CV. Details like this will make your cover letter too long. While these are valuable accomplishments, don’t include them unless there is something  that pertains to the group’s research, and your CV doesn’t cover it in depth. 

If you do choose to write about your research, write about concrete details and skills that aren’t in your CV. For example, if you have spent the last few years working on identifying the effects of a certain gene sequence in bird migration, include information about the lab techniques you used. Also, try to put emphasis on the aspects of your resume and CV that make you stand out from other candidates. It is likely that you will be competing with many similarly qualified candidates, so if you have a unique skill or experience, make sure it doesn’t get lost in the chaos—a cover letter is the perfect place to highlight these sorts of skills. 

Industry experience is a great differentiator. If you have relevant industry experience, make sure to include it in your cover letter because it will almost certainly set you apart. Another valuable differentiator is a deep and established research network. If you have been working on research teams for years and have deep connections with other scientists, don’t be afraid to include this information. This makes you a very valuable acquisition for the company because you come with an extensive network

Include Soft Skills in Your Cover Letter

Scientific skills aren’t the only consideration for hiring managers. Experience working with and leading teams is incredibly valuable in the research industry. Even if the job description doesn’t mention teamwork, add a story or description of a time you worked with (or, even better, lead) a successful team. Soft skills like management, customer service, writing, and clear communication are important in research positions. Highlight these abilities and experiences in your cover letter in addition to the hard skills and research-based information. 

If you are struggling to edit and polish your letter, give it to both someone within your field and someone who is completely unfamiliar with your research (or, at least, the technical side of it). Once both of those people say that the letter makes sense and is compelling, you should feel confident submitting it.

Cover letters are intended to give hiring managers information beyond what your resume and CV are able to display. Write with a natural but appropriately formal voice, do your research on the position, and cater to the job description. A good cover letter can go a long way to getting you an interview, and with these tips, your cover letters will certainly stand out of the pile.

Related Articles

Dissecting the interview.

cover letter researcher position

Casey Jenson

Earth Data Science And The Open Education Movement

cover letter researcher position

Ally Faller

cover letter researcher position

Lauren Herwehe

cover letter researcher position

Nathan A. Quarderer

Diversity, Equity, Justice & Inclusion in the Earth Observation Sector

cover letter researcher position

Cibele Amaral

Get in touch

Certificate form.

  • Premed Research

Research Assistant Cover Letter: The Ultimate Guide

Research Assistant Cover Letter

You should never underestimate the power of a good research assistant cover letter. Whether you are seeking to gain some research experience to bolster your applications for medical school and MD-PhD programs or seeking to get a coveted research assistant position, your cover letter is one of the key components of your application.

Research assistant cover letters can be tricky to write, but I'm going to guide you through this process. In this blog, you will learn why a cover letter is important, how to write your research assistant cover letter, learn tips to make your cover letter stand out, and get to read cover letter samples, including one with no research experience! Whether you're a premed or not, this ultimate guide will help you get your desired research position.

>> Want us to help you get accepted? Schedule a free strategy call here . <<

Listen to the blog!

Article Contents 17 min read

Why get involved in research.

Research is certainly one of the ways to build up your medical school application and impress the admissions committees with your extracurriculars for medical school . However, it is also your chance to build up professional skills and knowledge in the field of your interest. Admission committees appreciate applicants with a research background because these students demonstrate interest in actively shaping medical and scientific progress.

Since the research process is challenging and enriching, these students develop critical thinking skills and confidence to challenge the status quo. Research fosters patience and stamina. It provides freedom to experiment and a space for constructive criticism. If you are looking to gain research experience, do not limit your search to strictly medical positions. Pursue disciplines that interest you. Research skills can often be transferred to a variety of fields.

Unique research experiences will also make you stand out in your medical school applications. As you might already know, one of the most common medical school interview questions  you’ll be asked is how you can contribute to the diversity of the incoming class – research is your chance to add another unique experience to your application.

Research experience is highly valued by some of the top medical schools in the world. For example, over 90% of Ivy League medical schools’ matriculants have research experience. According to the latest data, 99% of  Stanford Medical School  matriculants have research and lab experience. Research is especially valuable if you are looking at MD-PhD programs.

Firstly, you should always send a cover letter in addition to your CV as part of your job or volunteer application, unless otherwise expressed by the recruiter. Even if you have had the chance to explain your motivation for applying in the application form or email, you should still include a separate cover letter. This letter is an additional opportunity to present yourself as the perfect candidate for the research position.

The primary goal of a research assistant cover letter is to intrigue your potential employer enough to invite you to an interview. Whether you’re an experienced researcher or an undergraduate student looking for research experience, your cover letter is the “face” of your application. Most likely, your cover letter will be the first document your potential colleagues read about you. A perfect research assistant cover letter should include the following:

Your cover letter must compel the reader to read your CV and other application components, if applicable. "}]" code="timeline3">

Simply put, your cover letter should explain why you are the most suitable candidate for the position. Your letter must demonstrate how you meet the criteria for the research position and what makes you a unique candidate. Additionally, this letter is your chance to show off your communication and language skills. Remember, research reports require the ability to articulate clearly and succinctly. Your strong technical research abilities must be accompanied by excellent verbal and written communication skills.

How to Write Your Cover Letter

Let’s examine what steps you need to take to create an outstanding research assistant cover letter.

Research the Position

First and foremost, when you write a cover letter for a research assistant position, you must know exactly what the position entails, what expectations your potential colleagues have of the new hire, and how this research position might develop in the future.

If you found a position as a job posting, it would certainly be wise to study the job description closely. It usually gives you some important, albeit surface, information. You can start by carefully studying the position summary, duties and responsibilities, qualifications, requirements, etc. However, this is usually not enough. Whether you found this position as a job posting or not, it is important to do your research.

Your cover letter needs to show that you are the best possible match for this research position. The job description you have found can only give you so much. You need to find out how your research interests match with this institution’s research program, what the recruiters are really looking for, and how it can help you in your future career as a medical professional or a researcher.

Start by researching the institution or department you’re applying to online. Research their programs, their research profile, and the research interests of their staff. Often you can find important information about the institution’s latest research ranking and their research projects on their website. It could also be interesting to read reviews written by people who have worked in the institution to which you’re applying. Do take these with a grain of salt, but some of these reviews can give you insights into the program’s expectations.

Another way to find out more information about the position is to contact the institution or the department. There is usually someone who can answer your questions, such as an administrative assistant, recruiter, or someone directly involved in the research project. They will be happy to answer any questions you might have about the job, the department, or the institution.

Avoid asking specific questions that will be covered in an interview such as “how much does the job pay” as this will send the impression that you're only interested in the position for the pay, and not because it's what you really want to do. Calling to inquire about the job may also make your name stand out among dozens of applicants for this position. The recruiters may make a note that you personally called and showed enthusiasm about the job.

Before you call, make sure you prepare a list of questions. Beware that your phone call may turn into an unofficial interview, especially if you talk to someone involved in the research process. Be ready to speak about yourself in relation to the position and prepare to answer some of the most common interview questions like “ Tell me about yourself ?”, “why do you want to work with us?” and so on. These are common introductory questions that allow the interviewer to get some insights about you as a potential colleague.

If you are a current undergraduate student, you can also try speaking to your classmates and any TAs you know who may have worked in the research lab you are applying to. You can ask them what they enjoyed and what they found challenging about the work, allowing you to learn from a first-person perspective what it is like to work in that lab.

It might seem like a lot of work, but researching the position, the institution, faculty, and staff will give you a competitive edge. Whoever reads your research assistant cover letter and CV will be able to tell the depth of your research. Your dedication and curiosity will really show in your application and distinguish you as a serious applicant from the rest of the hopefuls. It is also great preparation for the interview stage.

A research position cover letter should be no longer than a page. Your language must be succinct and clear. You must be able to demonstrate that you can express your ideas fluently and clearly – do not use informal language or include any fluff. Your cover letter is not the place to give a detailed account of every research position you have held.

Remember, your letter may go through several readers and not all of them may be researchers, so do not use overly technical language. Your letter must capture the interest of any reader, while further details of your research experiences and education can be included in your CV. If you want to accompany your cover letter with a stellar CV, check out our blog on how to write a CV for graduate school .

For your cover letter, use a classic font such as Times New Roman or Calibri sized 11 or 12 and break your letter into paragraphs. This order of paragraphs is not set in stone, but it may give you some ideas about how to structure your letter:

Remind the reader why you are a good fit for this job and restate your interest in the position. "}]">

Are you planning to apply to medical school? Check out how research can help you:

How to Stand Out in Your Research Position Cover Letter

When you prepare your cover letter, you need to reflect on what makes you a unique candidate for the research position to which you’re applying. To do this, think about what may differentiate you from the competition and try to anticipate what other candidates may offer.

First of all, try to analyze and have a clear understanding of your depth of expertise in this field. Do you have a high research profile? Have you had much research experience in this field? If your answer is yes, then it might be a good point to include in your cover letter. Perhaps you have demonstrated passion for this research field, and you want to commit your future to this area of research? Or maybe you want to stay and work in this particular institution? Perhaps you completed your undergraduate degree there and know the ins-and-outs of their labs? Try to think of yourself in relation to the position, your potential colleagues, and the department. You might find more connections upon a deeper inspection.

Another great selling point is your ability to access research and funding networks and organizations. If you have had success in applying to and receiving research grants or organizing fundraisers for your research projects, be sure to include this in your cover letter. A colleague who can increase funding for a research project is an invaluable addition to any team.

If you do not have a strong research background in this field, do not worry. Try to think of your personal research experience – do you have a diverse background? Does your particular blend of experiences give you a unique perspective? If you have had research experience in a variety of disciplines, it might be your competitive edge!

What if you have not had the chance to gain research experience? Maybe you have had a limited amount of opportunities for research? You can talk about this in your cover letter by expressing enthusiasm to be exposed to research. In this case, try to focus on your biggest successes and most relevant qualities. You might possess a qualification that would be highly relevant to this research position even if you’ve never had a serious research experience. Have your abilities to multitask been praised by previous employers? Have you received awards for teaching excellence? Are you particularly skilled with technology and computer software? All these qualities and accomplishments may help you impress the reader. Try to market yourself, your skills, and qualifications in relation to the position – you might have something other applicants don’t.

How to Look for Research Positions if You Have Little to No Experience

If you have little to no research experience, but want this experience for your medical school application or to be eligible to apply for a research position you really want – here are some tips:

1. If you’re out of school, finding out about research positions and opportunities is quite difficult. Oftentimes, research positions are not posted externally. Even within the institution, professors and PIs tend to select students they have taught to help them in their research projects.

With this said, there are things you can do to search for these opportunities. One of the most common ways to find a research position is to email professors in the departments you would like to join as a researcher. Whether you are still a student or a graduate, explain in your email that you want to volunteer in the lab. Do not mention money – state clearly that you want to gain research experience. Without experience, a paying research position is almost impossible to get. Start as a volunteer and see where it takes you.

  • Your cover letter should include your most recent successes. Talk about your most recent or current jobs.
  • You should present evidence that would support your relevancy for the position in the first half of the letter. Support your pertinent qualifications with examples of achievements from your previous or current roles (i.e. awards, distinctions, publications, etc.).
  • Illustrate your successes with brief but solid examples, explaining why you would be a good fit for this position.
  • Concentrate on achievements and qualities that make you unique, rather than simply listing the job description’s criteria.
  • Your cover letter should indicate that you spent much time researching the position, the faculty, and the institution. Demonstrate how well you know the role and the research context when explaining your career motivations.
  • Ensure your letter is error-free and clearly written. A grammatically correct and succinct letter is professional and shows the reader you are capable of communicating effectively in writing.

Things to Avoid in Your Research Assistant Cover Letter

  • Do not summarize your CV or give too much detail. Remember, the reviewer already has your CV so it's not appropriate to list items that are available elsewhere in your application. You must be selective about the qualifications and responsibilities you emphasize.
  • Do not leave out examples when you make statements about the relevancy of your skills and experiences.
  • Never send the same cover letter to more than one employer. Do not cut and paste from one letter to another. Your reader will be able to tell your lack of research and career focus.
  • Do not use jargon and overly technical vocabulary. You might want to come off as a knowledgeable candidate for this position but try to stick to a professional tone and language as much as possible.
  • Do not concentrate your cover letter on what the employer can do for you. Instead, focus on what you can do for the employer and the research project.
  • Do not make statements that are too general. For example, do not say “I’ve always wanted to work in this research field” – rather, show that you have worked in this research area and that you are passionate about this field. Do not write that you want to work for this institution or with this PI because they are famous all over the world. You must include other reasons for wanting to work with them. Searching for validation might make the wrong impression and eliminate you from the competition.

Some Important Don'ts for Research Assistant Cover Letters:

Do not make statements that are too general "}]" code="timeline2">

Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample #1

Dear Dr. Smith,

With this letter and enclosed CV, I would like to express my strong interest in the Research Assistant position you have available in the X department. I am a recent master’s graduate with experience in facilitating successful clinical trials. My graduate research involved working with clinicians and patient populations. Before my master’s, I graduated from a premed program at X university with the highest honors.

This research assistant position is a perfect combination of my educational background and my clinical experience. During my master’s degree, not only was I able to read, analyze, and interpret information from professional journals, technical procedures, and government regulations, but I also participated in clinical procedures directed by my PI, Dr. John Johnson. I completed and maintained case report forms as per FDA guidelines and reviewed them against the patient’s medical record for completeness and accuracy. I was heavily involved in assisting my superiors with the clinical process. I collected, processed, and shipped blood and urine specimens at scheduled patients’ visits. I was in charge of ensuring that all laboratory results were given to appropriate doctors for review of clinical significance, then filed the results in the patient study binder. My dedication to research and my team earned me the Research Assistant Excellence Award. Today, I am still in touch with my PI and my colleagues, with whom I have maintained professional and friendly ties. After recently graduating from my master’s degree, I am looking to apply my skills and knowledge to your research project.

Aside from learning a set of clinical and laboratory skills, working in research has trained my other competencies. My research position involved working in a team of researchers from different disciplines and nationalities. This experience significantly improved my ability to communicate as I often found myself explaining complex concepts to people outside of the medical field. Working with such an international team taught me to problem-solve and find quick solutions. For example, one aspect of the project involved collaborating with team members in Japan. We had a hard time communicating due to the time difference. I suggested to my colleagues and PI that we create a message board online where we could quickly ask questions and send documents back and forth; this board was available both on mobiles and computers, allowing for easier communication between our two teams at any time. This initiative improved our productivity and speed, as well as allowed us to quickly communicate practical solutions to any problems that came up during research. This successful collaboration resulted in the university funding our research project for one more year.

My interests and responsibilities outside of research would also make great contributions to your team. I am particularly impressed with your Institution’s commitment to improving patient experience in deprived communities. As an active volunteer at my local Street Heath Community Clinic, your dedication to providing healthcare to all in need is very inspiring. I am also drawn to your department's interdisciplinary approach. As a master's graduate, I learned the value of combining academic and clinical research. I know from experience that thinking beyond your discipline will only improve your research approach and results.

I am confident that my clinical research experience, my in-depth educational background, and interests make me an ideal match for this position. I would appreciate any opportunity to discuss my expertise in more detail at the interview and I look forward to hearing from you shortly.

Author’s signature

What makes this cover letter strong:

1. Uses a personal address.

2. States right away that his/her educational and research background are relevant.

3. Gives solid descriptions of his/her duties, experiences, and successes in the most recent research project.

4. Uses specific examples to show his/her soft skills, including superb communication skills.

5. Mentions that he/she was able to secure extra funding for a research project.

6. Includes interests outside of research that make him/her relevant to this institution.

7. Restates his/her interest and shows confidence in closing remarks.

Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample #2 (No Research Experience)

Dear Dr. Roe,

I am writing to you regarding the Research Assistant position available at the Biological Sciences department at X University. As a second-year pre-medical student at X University, I strive to gain in-depth, comprehensive research experience, and the position of an assistant in your research project may become my stepping stone into the world of scientific discovery and progress. I am certain that my academic and professional experiences make me the perfect candidate for this research position.  

Research demands high attention to detail and accuracy. As a sophomore student majoring in biochemistry, I understand the great responsibility of scientific research. I have been exposed to the intricate nature of scientific discovery and trained to think like a future researcher. Not only have I achieved grades in the 80th percentile in all my premed courses, but my lab experiences have taught me how to build a hypothesis and develop a method of inquiry. During lab work, experiments did not always work the first time. I sought feedback from my supervisor about how to refine my technique, always striving for better results. My attention to detail allowed me to reach great heights in my premed coursework and I am ready to apply the skills I have learned to a serious research project.

My interests and competencies reach beyond academia and can help me become a valuable member of your research team. As a member of the student council at X University over the last two years, I am in charge of developing successful state and federal grant applications. Last year, I was successful in obtaining a municipal grant that was used to renovate computer labs in the Y building on our campus. Additionally, my organizational skills are further demonstrated by the fundraising events I have helped organize with the student body. While research demands high levels of scientific expertise and knowledge, research also requires paperwork and financial support from the state – my background can help advance our research in this regard. 

While I have not had the chance to participate in professional research, I have substantial professional experience in keeping records and updating databases while working as an assistant to my mother in our family's grocery store. In addition to working with numbers at the till, I was in charge of keeping records of deliveries. This responsibility taught me to keep neat and accurate records while working with a lot of information – a skill that’s greatly valuable while documenting the research process and findings. 

Working at the grocery has also trained my ability to interact and get along with a variety of people. Through cooperating with people of different languages and cultures, I developed outstanding comprehension and communication skills, which help me not only in my academic work but also in my personal life. Research is not a lonely endeavor – rather, it is a cooperative effort where communication and patience are key. My professional background will certainly make me a suitable member of any research team, and I would be honored if you gave me a chance to showcase my talents.   

I look forward to discussing my candidacy with you further. If you would like any additional information that will help me gain this position, please let me know. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Author’s Signature

Check out our video for a quick recap:

In truth, the recruiter may decide to go with a candidate with more research experience than you. However, your cover letter is exactly the place where you can address any lack of experiences found in your resume or CV. This letter is an opportunity to reinforce yourself as a candidate, rather than highlight your flaws.

If you do not have specific research experience appropriate for the position, perhaps you can augment your candidacy by demonstrating other qualities that your recruiter is seeking for in their potential colleague. For example, you can demonstrate that you are a fast learner with experience in reading and analyzing complex information, or that you have experience in organizing and executing fundraising activities.

A cover letter is your chance to be more than a list of experiences and accomplishments. You can make them come alive and describe how they are relevant to the specific position to which you’re applying. CVs can be a few pages long, it's a lot of information for reviewers to sift through. Instead, they prefer an easy to read, one-page document that summarizes an applicant’s main accomplishments, experiences, and overall suitability for the role. Keep in mind that hiring departments may not even review your CV if they are not first impressed by your cover letter.

Your cover letter is an addition to your CV, and you need to show you can concisely focus on the strongest experiences you have had. A well-written cover letter demonstrates your ability to write and prioritize information clearly, which is something you must do as a researcher. Even though most job criteria have more than 3 qualities or skills they look for, it is important to stay succinct in your cover letter.

Remember, you cannot just list the skills but must show that you have them by using concrete examples of encounters and interactions you have had. Including examples will limit the number of skills you can include in your cover letter to a maximum of 3, as it is usually not possible to talk about more than 3 in any detail at all. So, reflect on your experiences and pick a maximum of 3 that you have solid examples for.

Your cover letter must be easy to follow and easy to read. Consider ordering your experiences in chronological order so the reader can follow the timeline of events easily. Include your most recent experiences.

Brainstorming experiences, creating an outline, writing, revising, and finalizing your cover letter may take a while, so think about giving yourself at least 1 week. Pay attention to the deadline to submit your job application and give yourself enough time.

Once you have created an outline and thought up experiences, you want to write your body paragraphs first, using a few sentences to describe each experience and what you gained from it that will contribute to this research position. You can then write succinct concluding and opening paragraphs. You want to ensure you read through your cover letter at least twice and correct any instances of unclear phrasing. Your first revision should be designed to change any wording or examples that are not as effective. Your second revision should finalize all the elements of your cover letter and include a check of grammar and fix any typos.

No, they don’t! You could have picked up relevant skills for a research position through academic experiences, but also through extracurriculars, volunteering, other work, or even personal experiences. For example, playing on a sports team teaches you a lot about perseverance, reliability, and teamwork. You can definitely include these types of experiences if you feel they are relevant.

To get an idea of what kind of experiences you should include, start by looking at the job posting. The job description should indicate the main criteria the recruiters are looking for in their candidates. Make a list of all the examples you can think of that relate to those criteria, and then choose a few that best highlight a variety of skills. Make sure to include the most recent examples in your cover letter.

If you’re an undergraduate student, start looking for research positions in your school. They may be posted in science department classrooms, on the departments' website pages, or around the lab spaces. It's also important to pay attention to your professors, perhaps they have mentioned that they are involved in a research project right now and are looking for a student assistant. If you're unsure, don't be afraid to ask them if they are looking for any help.

If you’re no longer a student, you can always reach out to your past professors and ask if they need any help with research. Make inquiries in local medical centers, hospitals, and other institutions. You will need to explain your situation and ask if they are looking for any help. Be aware that many entry-level positions are not paid well. Sometimes you may be required to help for free, but this will all depend on the position. If you have volunteered or shadowed a physician, you should reach out to them and ask if they are involved in research and could use your help.

If you are a serious researcher, you can look for research positions on job websites. These positions usually require an in-depth research background. If you are simply looking to gain some experience to build up your medical school applications, this option may not be for you. Some research projects last years and med schools can be skeptical of applicants who spend too much time on research and not enough time gaining clinical experience. They might wonder how well you will transition to patient interaction and clinical work.

You should avoid using any funky fonts, colors, or formatting in your cover letter. It is a professional document not suitable for experiments. So, stick to the standard font types and size, professional tone, and appearance.

You can certainly include these great achievements as long as they add to the overall narrative of your cover letter. Be sure to show what kind of skills and qualities your accomplishments helped you develop. Make your achievements come alive on the page.

Want more free tips? Subscribe to our channels for more free and useful content!

Apple Podcasts

Like our blog? Write for us ! >>

Have a question ask our admissions experts below and we'll answer your questions, get started now.

Talk to one of our admissions experts

Our site uses cookies. By using our website, you agree with our cookie policy .

FREE Training Webinar: How To Make Your Med School Application Stand Out

(and avoid the top 5 reasons that get 90% of applicants rejected).

Time Sensitive. Limited Spots Available:

Would you like a Premed Research experience that admissions committees love?

Swipe up to see a great offer!

cover letter researcher position

StandOut CV

Researcher cover letter examples

Andrew Fennell photo

Your head is already bursting with knowledge, but you love nothing more than doing your research and gathering new information.

Well, it’s time to put those research skills to use to find out more about the company and what the employer expects from your application.

In our guide below, we’ll show you what to include in your cover letter and how to use your research to your advantage. Check out our top tips and researcher cover letter examples below.

CV templates 

Researcher cover letter example 1

Researcher cover letter 1

Researcher cover letter example 2

Researcher cover letter 2

Researcher cover letter example 3

Researcher cover letter 3

The example cover letters here should give you a good general idea on how your Researcher cover letter should be formatted and written.

The rest of this guide gives more specific guidance on how to create your own cover letter in this format, and even includes some templates you can copy and paste.

How to write a Researcher cover letter

Here’s how you can write your own eye-catching cover letter, broken down into simple steps.

How to write a cover letter

Write your cover letter in the body of an email/message

When you send a cover letter with a job application, you should always write your message into the body of your email – or the body of the messaging system if you are sending via a job website.

Why do this?

Simply because you want to get your message seen as soon as the recruiter opens your application.

If you attach the cover letter as a separate item, this means the recipient will have to open it before they can read it – slowing down the process and potentially causing frustration along the way.

So, write your cover note in the body of your email/message to ensure you make an instant connection with the reader.

Write cover letter in body of email

Start with a friendly greeting

Cover letter address

Start you cover letter with a greeting that is professional but friendly.

This will build rapport with the recruiter whilst showing your professionalism.

  • Hi, hope you’re well
  • Hi [insert recruiter name]
  • Hi [insert department/team name]

Avoid overly formal greetings like “Dear sir/madam ” unless applying to very traditional companies.

How to find the contact’s name?

Addressing the recruitment contact by name is an excellent way to start building a strong relationship. If it is not listed in the job advert, try these methods to find it.

  • Check out the company website and look at their  About page. If you see a hiring manager, HR person or internal recruiter, use their name. You could also try to figure out who would be your manager in the role and use their name.
  • Head to LinkedIn , search for the company and scan through the list of employees. Most professionals are on LinkedIn these days, so this is a good bet.

Identify the role you are applying for

Once you’ve opened up the cover letter with a warm greeting to start building a relationship, it is time to identify which role you want to apply for.

Recruiters are often managing multiple vacancies, so you need to ensure you apply to the correct one.

Be very specific and use a reference number if you can find one.

  • I am interested in applying for the position of Researcher with your company.
  • I would like to apply for the role of Sales assistant (Ref: 406f57393)
  • I would like to express my interest in the customer service vacancy within your retail department
  • I saw your advert for a junior project manager on Reed and would like to apply for the role.

See also: CV examples – how to write a CV – CV profiles

Highlight your suitability

The bulk of your cover letter should be focused around highlighting your suitability for the job you are applying to.

Doing this will show the recruiter that you are suitable candidate and encourage them to open your CV.

The best way to do this, is by studying the job advert you are applying to, and find out what the most important skills and knowledge are.

Once you know the most important requirements, you then need to highlight your matching skills to the recruiter. In a few sentences, tell them exactly why you are a good fit for the job and what you can offer the company.

Cover letter tips

Keep it short and sharp

When sending a job application to a recruiter or hiring manager, it is important to remember that they will normally be very busy and pushed for time.

Therefore, you need to get you message across to them quickly (in a matter of seconds ideally). So, keep your cover letter short and to-the-point. A long waffling cover letter will overwhelm recruiters when they are running through hundreds of emails in there inbox, but a concise one will get their attention.

So, keep your cover letter to just a few sentences long, and save the extensive detail for your CV.

Sign off professionally

To finish off your cover note, add a professional signature to the bottom, stating your important contact details and information.

This not only provides recruiters with multiple means of contacting you, but it also adds a nice professional appearance to the cover letter, which shows that you know how to conduct yourself in the workplace.

Include the following points;

  • A friendly sign off – e.g. “Warm regards”
  • Your full name
  • Phone number (one you can answer quickly)
  • Email address
  • Profession title
  • Professional social network – e.g. LinkedIn

Here is an example signature;

Warm regards,

Aaron Smith Customer service professional 075557437373 [email protected] LinkedIn

Quick tip : To save yourself from having to write your signature every time you send a job application, you can save it within your email drafts, or on a separate document that you could copy in.

Email signatures

What to include in your Researcher cover letter

Your Researcher cover letter will be unique to your situation, but there are certain content guidelines you should stick to for best results.

To attract and entice recruiters, stick with the following key subjects in your cover letter – adapting them to fit your profession and target jobs.

  • Your professional experience – Employers will be keen to know if your experience is suitable for the job you are applying to, so provide a good summary of it in your cover letter.
  • Your qualifications and education – Highlight your most relevant and high-level of qualification, especially if they are essential to the job.
  • The positive impact you have made – Employers love to hear about the benefits you can bring to them, so shout about anything impressive you have done, such as saving money or improving processes.
  • Your reasons for leaving – Use a few words of your cover letter to explain why you are leaving your current job and ensure you avoid any negative reasons.
  • Your availability – Let recruiters know when you can start a new job . Are you immediately available, or do you have a month notice period?

Researcher cover letter templates

Copy and paste these Researcher cover letter templates to get a head start on your own.

Good morning, Layla

Attached you will find my CV in application for the Graduate Researcher position at Aspire Ltd, as advertised on Glassdoor. With a BSc in Mathematics and a passion for pushing the boundaries of knowledge, I am excited about the opportunity to contribute to your team’s research endeavours.

During my studies at the University of London, I developed a passion for computational sciences and statistical techniques. My coursework in equipped me with strong analytical and critical thinking skills, which I am eager to apply to real-world research projects.

I completed an 8-month internship at Crown Continental Limited, where I helped improve data processing efficiency by 35% through collaborating with team members in developing a custom software tool for automating complex mathematical simulations. In addition, I was pivotal in finalising five major projects one week ahead of schedule on average.

I am excited about the opportunity to apply my skills to towards exploring new avenues of inquiry. Feel free to reach out to me via email or phone, as I am available for an interview at your earliest convenience.

Kind regards

James Doyle

Good day Shaun

I am writing to apply for the Researcher position at Revealing Reality. With 8 years of experience in designing/conducting impactful social studies, I am excited about contributing my insights to your team.

Throughout my career working for the UK Innovation Group, I have focused on qualitative research, survey creation and data analysis to investigate the interactions between individuals, and characteristics, structures, and functions of diverse populations/institutions, such as families, communities, schools, workplaces, as well as physical, economic, cultural, and policy environments.

My contributions to numerous large-scale projects enabled me to secure £4M and £2M respectively for studies that uncovered significant findings concerning adequate standards of living and rights to food. Furthermore, I collaborated with colleagues in enhancing participant satisfaction by 10%+ through offering incentives and holding their interest for the duration of various studies.

Please do not hesitate to reach out to me to discuss how my qualifications and competencies make me the idea candidate for the role. I am flexible with my schedule and can accommodate an interview at a time that works best for you.

Alexander Perry

I am pleased to reach out to you concerning the Senior Pharmaceutical Researcher position at Astra Zeneca. With extensive experience in designing, leading, and executing poignant drug development studies, I am confident in my ability to contribute actionable insights and innovation to your team.

Throughout my 18-year career working for Apollo Therapeutics, I have helped spearhead 2K+ diverse project initiatives, ranging from treatment creation, formulation optimisation, and clinical trials, where my supervision efforts resulted in the launch of numerous novel pharmaceutical products that led to the company gaining £150B in profits. Additionally, I guided manufacturing optimisation activities which increased production efficiency by 20%+ and lowered overall costs by 10%.

As a consummate professional, I also guarantee the successful processing of patent applications, regulatory approvals, while helping with the publication of papers in reputable journals.

Enclosed is my CV that outlines by comprehensive scientific qualifications, skills, and other achievements. Please let me know your preferred date and time for an interview, and I will ensure to be there promptly.

Writing a strong attention-grabbing cover letter is a vital step in landing a good Researcher job.

Use the tips, strategies and examples above to get more responses from you job applications and start lining job interview up.

Good luck with your job search!

Research Scientist cover letter template header

How to Write an Research Scientist Cover Letter (With Template)

Gabriele Culot

Key takeaways

  • A cover letter can be the most important element in a job application. Ensuring your profile stands out to recruiters is crucial to your professional success.
  • A well-tailored cover letter should provide relevant information clearly and concisely. Focus on detailing your skills and why you are the right person for that specific role.
  • The included Research Scientist cover letter template provides an easy starting point to craft your own cover letters. Adapt and personalize it to fit your profile.

A well-written cover letter is key to quickly getting the attention of prospective employers. Among countless job seekers, resumes, and application letters, yours need to stand out on first impression if you want to ensure your job search   translates to a new role .

In this post, you will discover:

  • Reasons why a well-crafted cover letter is key to professional success, from entry-level roles to senior positions
  • Cover letter do’s and dont’s
  • A Research Scientist sample cover letter you can easily adapt and personalize

A well-tailored   cover letter : The key to   job application   success

Ensuring you know how to write a cover letter that is clear, informative, and tailored to the role you are applying to will benefit you in many ways. Well-crafted cover letters have many benefits, which include:

  • Showcasing relevance:   Tailoring your cover letter allows you to emphasize the most relevant skills, experiences, and achievements that align with the specific job requirements. This immediately captures the attention of the   talent acquisition   team, recruiters, or human resources reps.
  • Demonstrating research:   A good cover letter conveys your understanding of the organization's needs and illustrates how you can contribute to its success, signaling to potential employers that you've done your homework.
  • Telling your story:   Each job application is unique, and a tailored cover letter enables you to craft a personalized narrative. It lets you connect your professional journey with the role's specific challenges and opportunities, making your application more compelling.
  • Highlighting cultural fit:   Your cover letter allows you to address the company's values, mission, and culture. By aligning your experiences and values with those of the organization, you demonstrate a cultural fit and convey your enthusiasm for being part of the team.
  • Addressing specific requirements:   Job postings often include   specific skills or qualifications   the employer is seeking. Tailoring your cover letter enables you to address these requirements directly, showcasing how you possess the desired attributes and can meet the company's expectations.

Cover letter tips

A great cover letter should reflect your professional profile and personality. However, no matter what your cover letter's content is, the tips below will help ensure the message you want to convey is clear and easily accessible to hiring managers.

  • Keep it concise:   Aim for a cover letter length of 250-400 words. Be succinct in presenting your qualifications and experiences.
  • Use a clean layout:   Opt for a professional and clean cover letter format with a standard font (e.g., Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman) and a font size of 10-12 points.
  • Include   contact information :   Provide your contact information at the top of the cover letter, including your name, phone number, and professional email address.
  • Use   headers   and sections:   Organize your cover letter into clear sections with headers such as Introduction, Work Experience, and Achievements for easy readability.
  • Maintain a professional tone:   Keep the tone of your cover letter professional and upbeat. Avoid overly casual language, and focus on showcasing your skills and experiences.
  • Use keywords:   Incorporate relevant keywords from the Agile Project Manager   job description   and company website into your cover letter. This can help your application pass through   applicant tracking systems (ATS)   used by many employers.
  • Highlight achievements with bullet points:   Use bullet points to list specific accomplishments or notable projects. This makes it easier for the reader to grasp your accomplishments quickly.
  • Use quantifiable data:   Whenever possible, include quantifiable data to demonstrate the impact of your achievements. Numbers provide concrete evidence of your contributions.
  • Match company tone:   Adapt your writing style to match the tone of the company and industry. Research the company's culture to strike the right balance between professionalism and personality.
  • Showcase company knowledge:   Demonstrate your understanding of the company by referencing its values, mission, or recent achievements. Explain why you're excited about the opportunity to work for this specific organization.
  • Address employment gaps (if applicable):   If you have employment gaps, briefly address them in a positive light, focusing on any skills or experiences gained during those periods.
  • Proofread   thoroughly:   Eliminate typos and grammatical errors by proofreading your cover letter multiple times. Consider using tools like Grammarly to catch any overlooked mistakes and ensure your English (or any language you use) is correct.
  • Include a   call to action :   Conclude your cover letter with a call to action, expressing your enthusiasm for the opportunity and indicating your readiness for an interview.
  • Follow submission instructions:   If there are specific instructions for submitting the cover letter, such as naming conventions or document formats, ensure that you adhere to them.
  • Save as a PDF:   Save your cover letter as a PDF before submitting it. This ensures that the formatting remains consistent across different devices and software.

While understanding the correct steps to write a cover letter is crucial to your professional success, knowing what mistakes to avoid is equally important. The best cover letter can easily be made useless by a tiny blunder. Avoid making the mistakes listed below; you will be halfway to your new job.

  • Don't use a generic greeting:   Avoid generic salutations like "To whom it may concern," “Dear sir or madam, “ or “Dear hiring manager.“ Whenever possible, address the cover letter to a specific person.
  • Don't repeat your resume:   An effective cover letter should complement your resume, not duplicate it. Focus on specific experiences and achievements that showcase your qualifications for the role.
  • Don't exaggerate or lie:   Be truthful in your cover letter. Exaggerating your qualifications or providing false information can harm your chances and damage your professional reputation.
  • Don't use unprofessional email addresses:   Ensure that the email address you use in your contact information is professional. Avoid using nicknames or unprofessional terms.
  • Don't include irrelevant information:   Keep your cover letter focused on the job. Avoid including unrelated personal details or experiences that do not contribute to your suitability for the role.
  • Don't use jargon unnecessarily:   While demonstrating your knowledge is essential, avoid unnecessary jargon that may confuse the reader. Use clear and straightforward language.
  • Don't sound overly eager:   Expressing enthusiasm is positive but can easily feel unauthentic if overdone.

Remember, the goal of a practical cover letter is to present your qualifications in a clear, organized, and compelling manner while adhering to professional standards.

How to structure your Research Scientist   cover letter

Express your genuine interest in the Research Scientist position at [Research Institution or Company Name] in the opening paragraph. Communicate your passion for scientific discovery, data analysis, and your eagerness to contribute to a team dedicated to advancing knowledge and making significant contributions to your field. If applicable, mention any referrals that have influenced your decision to apply for this specific role.

About your current role

Highlight your achievements and effective research strategies that have positively impacted the success of your current team. Emphasize your role in designing and conducting experiments, analyzing complex datasets, and contributing to high-impact research projects. Demonstrate your proficiency in research methodologies, advanced data analysis techniques, and your ability to lead and collaborate with multidisciplinary teams.

Use this section to outline your current responsibilities and ongoing projects, emphasizing how they align with the requirements and objectives of the Research Scientist role.

About your experience

Detail your extensive hands-on experience in research scientist roles, showcasing your ability to conceptualize and lead research projects, publish in reputable journals, and contribute to the advancement of your field. Clearly communicate that your research skills and readiness for the role are well-established. This section is also an opportunity to highlight any relevant publications, presentations, or additional skills you've acquired throughout your research career.

Notable achievements

Highlight notable accomplishments that showcase your effectiveness as a Research Scientist. Whether you played a key role in a groundbreaking research project, developed novel research methodologies, or contributed to significant advancements in your field, use this section to concisely mention your achievements, how they were measured, and their impact on the overall success of the research projects you've been involved in.

Why you want to work there

Express your interest in the institution or company by highlighting specific aspects of its research focus, mission, and values related to your field of expertise that resonate with you. Convey how these align seamlessly with your professional goals and how you envision contributing to the organization's success through your expertise as a research scientist. Be concise but articulate about your motivations.

Specific projects or initiatives that motivated you to apply

Demonstrate your understanding of the organization by referencing specific research-related projects or initiatives that have captured your interest. Draw connections between these initiatives and your skills and experiences, emphasizing how your contributions align with the institution or company's goals for advancing scientific knowledge. This shows your genuine interest and proactive approach to aligning with the organization's mission.

In the closing paragraph, reiterate your enthusiasm to contribute to the organization's success as a Research Scientist. Express your eagerness to discuss how your skills align with the organization's research objectives and invite the reader to reach out with any questions they may have. Sign off with a professional salutation.

Research Scientist   cover letter template

Dear [Hiring Manager’s name],

I am writing to express my interest in the Research Scientist position at [Institution or Company Name], as advertised. With a strong background in [Your Field of Expertise] and a proven track record of conducting impactful research, I am eager to contribute my skills and expertise to your esteemed research team.

About my current role

In my current position as a Research Scientist at [Current Institution or Company], I have:

  • Led and conducted independent and collaborative research projects in [Your Field of Expertise].
  • Published research findings in reputable journals and presented at national and international conferences.
  • Mentored and collaborated with junior researchers, fostering a collaborative and innovative research environment.

About my Research Scientist experience

My experience extends to:

  • Designing and executing experiments, ensuring the integrity and validity of research methodologies.
  • Utilizing advanced research techniques and methodologies, such as [specific techniques or tools relevant to your field].
  • Securing research funding through successful grant applications and contributing to proposal writing.

Some of my notable achievements include:

  • Leading a research project that resulted in [specific research outcome, e.g., a new discovery, a novel methodology, etc.].
  • Establishing collaborations with [specific institutions or researchers], enhancing the reach and impact of research projects.
  • Contributing to the development of [specific technology or product] based on research findings.

Why I want to work for [Institution or Company]

I am particularly drawn to [Institution or Company Name] due to its [mention aspects unique to the institution or company such as commitment to cutting-edge research, renowned researchers on the team, access to state-of-the-art facilities, growth,...]. I am excited about the opportunity to contribute to [Institution or Company Name]'s reputation for excellence in [Your Field of Expertise] and to collaborate with other leading researchers in the field.

Specific research projects or initiatives of [Institution or Company] that motivated me to apply

In researching [Institution or Company Name], I was impressed by your recent projects in [specific research focus or area]. I believe my expertise in [Your Field of Expertise] aligns seamlessly with your organizational objectives. My commitment to rigorous and impactful research and my dedication to advancing knowledge in the field would make me a valuable addition to your research team.

Thank you for considering my application. I am eager to further discuss how my skills and experiences align with the Research Scientist role at [Institution or Company Name]. I look forward to contributing to your team's success.

[Your Full Name]

Get your career rolling with Deel

Your job application is your chance to tell your professional story, and a well-tailored cover letter is your narrative's opening chapter. Remember that personalization is key. Make each word count, emphasizing how your background uniquely positions you as the ideal candidate, and get your dream job. 

Looking for even more inspiration?   Discover how to write a stellar cover letter in 5 steps .

Discover more tips and tools to help boost your career further and climb the steps to your dream job on   the get-hired content hub .

Deel makes growing remote and international teams effortless. Ready to get started?

Legal experts

cover letter researcher position

  • Hire Employees
  • Hire Contractors
  • Run Global Payroll
  • Integrations
  • For Finance Teams
  • For Legal Teams
  • For Hiring Managers
  • Deel Solutions - Spain
  • Deel Solutions - France
  • Support hub
  • Global Hiring Guide
  • Partner Program
  • Case Studies
  • Service Status
  • Worker Community
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms of Service
  • Whistleblower Policy
  • Cookie policy
  • Cookie Settings

Professional Researcher Cover Letter Example for 2024

Read for inspiration or use it as a base to improve your own Researcher cover letter. Just replace personal information, company application data and achievements with your own.

Avatar image

Have a researcher cover letter that tells your story

Would a good cover letter increase your chances of landing an interview? Yes.

Do we have any specific tips for Researcher applications? Yes.

Are cover letters the same as resumes, but longer? Definitely not!

So what are cover letters?

Well, great cover letters give you the opportunity to tell a personal story, while making the right impression and proving you’re the best candidate at the same time.

Need more details? Let’s dive deep.

researcher coverletter.png

So what’s the difference between a cover letter and a resume?

In short – the resume showcases your achievements and skills, while the cover letter focuses more on your personality and motivations.

Of course, you should mention some of your relevant skills in the cover letter as well. But make sure you’re not repeating your resume word by word.

Now let's move on to the things that make every cover letter great!

Address your cover letter to the right person and make your introduction strong

Choosing the right salutation for your cover letter is crucial – after all, it’s the first thing the hiring manager will read.

For this reason, we’ve gathered several classic salutations. Note that some of them could be used even if you don't know the hiring manager's name.

  • Dear [company name] Recruiter
  • Dear Mr./Ms. Smith
  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • To the [team you're applying for] Team

The introduction of your Researcher cover letter is without a doubt crucial for the first impression you’ll make as an applicant. But is there a way to make sure your opening line is good enough?

Yes, there is. You can start by sharing your enthusiasm for the job or the field (or why not both!). You could also share your reasons to find the company exciting.

Try to be original. Don’t go for phrases like “I want to apply for the position that I saw advertised on platform X”. They're outdated and sound like you’ve got nothing better to say

Emphasize your Researcher soft skills and mention your hard skills

So what skills do you need to include? Well, unfortunately, there’s no one answer to this. It all depends on the job description and the skills you’ve currently got.

According to experts, what recruiters look for in cover letters is how you can link your soft skills to particular achievements and goals. So, try to figure out what has helped you on the way to success.

However, don’t forget about hard skills. Even if they’re not the focus of your happy story, you need to include at least the ones that were mentioned as part of the requirements section of the job posting. This will help you pass applicant tracking systems (ATS) that screen applicant documents for certain keywords and phrases.

Show that you know the company and its problems well

Proving that you’re familiar with the company is a great way to win the recruiter’s heart. It shows that you’ve taken some time for research and that you’re attentive to detail.

What’s more, it will also help you find out the issues at hand. This way, you can link your own skills and qualifications to some potential challenges the company might have to deal with in the future.

End on a positive note

While the introduction is the best way to make a good impression, using the right words to end your cover letter can help you get a callback.

Our advice is to make sure that your closing line matches the company culture. However, “Looking forward to hearing from you” and other traditional phrases are always a safe choice.

Researcher cover letter

Cover letter examples by industry

  • Civil Engineer
  • Systems Engineer
  • Engineering Intern
  • Entry Level Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Engineering
  • Engineering Manager
  • Mechanical Design Engineer
  • Biomedical Engineer
  • Product Engineer
  • Process Engineer
  • Chemical Engineer
  • Manufacturing Engineer
  • Research Assistant
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Entry Level Civil Engineer
  • Entry Level Mechanical Engineer
  • Industrial Engineer

Cover letters helped people get noticed

Google logo

Updated for today’s recruitment standards

Worried your cover letter design is past the expiration date? We’ll help you craft a new one that leaves an impression and beats luck.

Daniel Pietersen's photo

Daniel Pietersen

Senior customer support engineer.

" Enhancv gave me a sense of relief and a feeling of confidence when passing it along to a potential employer. "

Daniel Pietersen on using Enhancv

Check out more winning cover letter examples for inspiration

Learn from people who have succeeded in their job hunt.

  • Pharmacist Cover Letter
  • Project Manager Cover Letter
  • Sales Manager Cover Letter
  • Tax Preparer Cover Letter
  • Translator Cover Letter
  • Project Engineer Cover Letter
  • Machinist Cover Letter
  • Qa Manager Cover Letter
  • Flight Attendant Cover Letter
  • Budget Analyst Cover Letter
  • Sales Analyst Cover Letter
  • Certified Medical Assistant Cover Letter

related resume

Become the center of attention with a matching Researcher resume

Pairing your strong cover letter with a great resume can never be a bad idea. In fact, that’s one of the best ways to show you’re the ideal candidate for the position.

Tell your story with confidence with a job-winning Researcher resume template.

Still not sure what your cover letter should look like? Hire an expert to help you!

Article image

How to Write a Second Interview Thank-You Email (Template Included)

Article image

What Is An Enclosure In A Cover Letter

Article image

How to Answer "Why Have You Changed Jobs So Frequently" Interview Question

Article image

Alice's resume for a masters scholarship

Article image

What Not to Put on a Resume

Article image

Which Resume Font to Use for Making an Outstanding Resume

  • Create Resume
  • Terms of Service
  • Privacy Policy
  • Cookie Preferences
  • Resume Examples
  • Resume Templates
  • AI Resume Builder
  • Resume Formats
  • Resume Checker
  • Resume Skills
  • How to Write a Resume
  • Modern Resume Templates
  • Simple Resume Templates
  • Cover Letter Builder
  • Cover Letter Examples
  • Cover Letter Templates
  • Cover Letter Formats
  • How to Write a Cover Letter
  • Resume Guides
  • Cover Letter Guides
  • Job Interview Guides
  • Job Interview Questions
  • Career Resources
  • Meet our customers
  • Career resources
  • English (UK)
  • French (FR)
  • German (DE)
  • Spanish (ES)
  • Swedish (SE)

© 2024 . All rights reserved.

Made with love by people who care.

Research Technician Position in the Stavropoulos Lab at Rutgers Waksman Institute of Microbiology

The Stavropoulos laboratory at the Waksman Institute and Rutgers University is seeking a full-time research technician to perform research on the mechanisms that regulate sleep. Our studies use the fruit fly Drosophila to characterize genes and brain circuits underlying sleep-wake cycles.

Bachelor’s degree in science and prior laboratory experience are required. Emphasis in molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry, or neuroscience is helpful. Candidates should be highly motivated, enthusiastic about research, and able to work both collaboratively and independently. This opportunity provides an ideal training environment for those pursuing careers in scientific research and medicine. A two-year commitment is required. Applicants should send a cover letter, CV, transcript, and a list of references to Dr. Nicholas Stavropoulos ([email protected]) or apply at the Rutgers portal (https://jobs.rutgers.edu/postings/220671).

  • Job Opportunities
  • Post-bac Opportunities

IMAGES

  1. Cover Letter Examples by Real People: Science research associate cover

    cover letter researcher position

  2. Research Intern Cover Letter

    cover letter researcher position

  3. 30 Cover Letter For Research Job

    cover letter researcher position

  4. Cover Letter Template Research Position • Invitation Template Ideas

    cover letter researcher position

  5. Research Associate Cover Letter Sample

    cover letter researcher position

  6. Cancer Researcher Cover Letter

    cover letter researcher position

VIDEO

  1. create your europass cv & cover letter. #europasscv #europass #coverletter #europeancv #jobsinmalta

  2. Diego Garcia whistleblowers letter to Ashton Forbes

  3. ,,i use some kind of glass to make sure what is the design or letter,,chines letter,and many horses

  4. Cover letter for Researcher, Guest Scientist VISA

  5. Cover Letter Prep

  6. How to Create a Compelling Cover Letter that Stands Out!

COMMENTS

  1. Researcher Cover Letter Example and Template for 2023

    If you're looking for a job as a researcher, writing a great cover letter is an important step in getting a position in this profession. When writing your cover letter, first look at the requirements and qualifications mentioned in the company's job description.

  2. How to Write a Good Cover Letter for a Research Position

    While writing a cover letter for a research position, you have to walk a fine line of proving your expertise and passion while limiting jargon and dense language. In this post, we will explain cover letter writing basics, and then dive into how to write a research specific cover letter with examples of both good and bad practices.

  3. How To Write a Successful Research Assistant Cover Letter

    1. Research the organization, researcher and project When writing a cover letter, it's important to make it specific to the position you're seeking. If you're applying for a role as a research assistant, try to mention the project or assignment you expect to work on specifically.

  4. How to Write a Researcher Cover Letter (Plus Example)

    Here's an example of a researcher's cover letter: Anna Paul. 555-555-1212, [email protected], Toronto, Ontario, M4Y 2K1. Dear hiring manager, I'm writing to apply for the researcher position at your company. I'm confident that I'm the ideal candidate for the job because of my excellent research skills and experience.

  5. Researcher Cover Letter Examples & Samples for 2024

    Free Researcher cover letter example Dear Mr. Roberts: When I learned of your need for an experienced and analytical Researcher to join your team, I hastened to send you my resume.

  6. How to Write a Great Research Assistant Cover Letter (Sample Included

    How do you write a cover letter for a research position? What should a research assistant cover letter include? What can you say to prove you'd be an exceptional research assistant? And, here's another concern: How do you write the best research assistant cover letter when you have no experience?

  7. Research Assistant Cover Letter Example & Tips

    17 July 2023 Alex Reed 5508 Terrace Drive La Crescenta, CA, 91214 (818) 835-3371 [email protected] Dear Dr. Reed, I'm writing to you regarding the Lab Research Assistant position at BioSpace. I'm confident my academic background in molecular biology and biomedical research experience will make me a competent contributor to your team.

  8. Research Analyst Cover Letter Example and Template 2024

    771-555-0199 | [email protected] | Jackson, Miss. January 4, 2023 Dear hiring manager, I am excited to apply for your Research Analyst position at Jackson Research Professionals.

  9. Research Assistant Cover Letter: The Ultimate Guide

    Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample #1. Dear Dr. Smith, With this letter and enclosed CV, I would like to express my strong interest in the Research Assistant position you have available in the X department. I am a recent master's graduate with experience in facilitating successful clinical trials.

  10. Research Assistant Cover Letter Samples (Lab, Technician)

    Updated: December 22, 2023 Article Rating: Our customers have been hired by: Table of Contents Ready to concoct the perfect research assistant cover letter? You've got the lab skills and data-crunching expertise, but it's time to prove you're the missing variable in your dream job equation.

  11. Research Assistant Cover Letter Examples & Expert tips [Free]

    Adaptable cover letter greeting and introduction example. Dear Professor McMahon, For the past four years, I have been working in the psychology department of Miami University as a research assistant, on both field- and laboratory-based research projects around cognitive health across a range of age profiles.

  12. 3 Researcher cover letter examples [Land top jobs]

    CV templates Researcher cover letter example 1 Researcher cover letter example 2 Researcher cover letter example 3 CV templates The example cover letters here should give you a good general idea on how your Researcher cover letter should be formatted and written.

  13. Research Assistant Cover Letter Sample & Template for 2024

    Pick a cover letter template here. 3. Introduce Yourself and What Position You're Applying To. The objective of the first paragraph of your research assistant cover letter is simple: Tells them when your cover letter is relevant for the position. You'll need to address the hiring manager by name in your greeting.

  14. How to Write a Research Assistant Cover Letter (With Template)

    Keep it concise: Aim for a cover letter length of 250-400 words. Be succinct in presenting your qualifications and experiences. Use a clean layout: Opt for a professional and clean cover letter format with a standard font (e.g., Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman) and a font size of 10-12 points.

  15. How to Write an Research Scientist Cover Letter (With Template)

    Keep it concise: Aim for a cover letter length of 250-400 words. Be succinct in presenting your qualifications and experiences. Use a clean layout: Opt for a professional and clean cover letter format with a standard font (e.g., Arial, Calibri, or Times New Roman) and a font size of 10-12 points.

  16. How To Write A Cover Letter For A Researcher (With Template)

    Updated 23 March 2023 Researchers use various methods to collect, analyse and interpret data and investigate the behaviours of people with specific issues. If you want to apply for a researcher job, submitting a cover letter that summarises your research skills and experience can allow you to make a positive first impression.

  17. Real Researcher Cover Letter Example for 2024

    (558) 333-1333 [email protected] COVER LETTER Dear John, I am writing to ask that I be considered for the Research Associate position, Reconciliation Through Engineering Initiative (RTEI). I learned about this opportunity through Eli Enns, whom I am actively working with to build capacity for Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas (IPCAs).

  18. How to Write the Best Cover Letter for a Research Scientist Job

    Research scientists are a critical component of the life science industry.According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), medical scientists earn a median annual salary of $84,810 and typically have a doctoral or professional degree.. Some may have an M.D. but conduct research in addition to, or instead of, practicing as a physician. The BLS projects job growth for medical scientists at a ...

  19. Research Assistant Cover Letter Example and Template for 2024

    In this article, we define the research assistant role, explain why cover letters are important and discuss how to write a cover letter for this position. Once you've written your cover letter and resume, you can upload a resume file or build an Indeed Resume. Are you looking for a job now? Angela Barry

  20. Research Associate Cover Letter: Example & Guide

    Here's how to create a professional cover letter heading : Write your name, position title, and contact information at the top of the page, in that order. Skip one line, then write down the city and date of writing. Skip one more line. Include the hiring manager's name and position, the company name, and their address.

  21. Great Research Associate Cover Letter Examples

    [email protected]. Dear Mr. Park, I am writing to apply for the Research Associate position with Company Name. I hold five years of experience in academic and institutional research and have the skills required to excel in this position. As an Institutional Research Associate for Overland University I collect and analyze data then present my ...

  22. Research Assistant Cover Letter Example (Free Guide)

    Key Components For Research Assistant Cover Letters: Your contact information, including the date of writing. The recipient's details, such as the company's name and the name of the addressee. A professional greeting or salutation, like "Dear Mr. Levi,"

  23. Research Technician Position in the Stavropoulos Lab at Rutgers Waksman

    The Stavropoulos laboratory at the Waksman Institute and Rutgers University is seeking a full-time research technician to perform research on the mechanisms that regulate sleep. Our studies use the fruit fly Drosophila to characterize genes and brain circuits underlying sleep-wake cycles. Bachelor's degree in science and prior laboratory experience are required. Emphasis in molecular biology ...

  24. What records are exempted from FERPA?

    Records which are kept in the sole possession of the maker of the records, are used only as a personal memory aid, and are not accessible or revealed to any other person except a temporary substitute for the maker of the records.

  25. How To Write a User Research Cover Letter (With Example)

    How to write a user research cover letter. You can follow this step-by-step guide to write a cover letter for a user research position: 1. Start with your information. Your cover letter starts with your basic contact information at the top. Details to include are your name, phone number and email address. You can also include your home address ...